Public health as an international matter

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A place for serious discussion on any non-religious topic

Re: Public health as an international matter

Postby Bev » November 24th, 2014, 2:30 pm

Yes, it was two who died. The first was a citizen who had contracted it in Africa but developed symptoms shortly after arriving in the US. The other was a doctor who contracted it there but was flown to the US for treatment. I don't know how many other cases were brought here for treatment, but there were two who contracted it here. They were both nurses at the hospital where the first man was treated. They both survived.
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Re: Public health as an international matter

Postby different glory » November 27th, 2014, 7:06 am

Thanks, Bev. :)

Further about the importance of internationalism in health responses: it seems that anti-polio work in Nigeria has a beneficial knock-on effect for ebola as well - and of course that neighbouring countries and the international community will/would also benefit if polio is eliminated in Nigeria.
That I may publish with the voice of thanksgiving, and tell of all thy wondrous works. - Psalm 26
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Re: Public health as an international matter

Postby GregB » November 27th, 2014, 7:51 am

Indeed, but hopefully the fanatical Nigerian Islamist group, Boko Haram, won't be taking a leaf out of the book of the Muslim extremists in Pakistan who are killing polio vaccination workers out of sheer paranoia (example below.) The facility with which these fanatics take lives for whatever reason ('blasphemy', honour killings, supposed adultery, etc.) is truly chilling.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-11-27/m ... an/5921824
"To be ignorant of what occurred before you were born is to remain always a child."
- Cicero
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Re: Public health as an international matter

Postby different glory » December 1st, 2014, 12:26 pm

Indeed. Vaccination is far too useful a tool in the public health kit to be lightly set aside. :( Which makes me wonder if the usual measles, mumps etc are a matter for international co-operation - possibly not? It may be that incubation times etc render them not of interest in that way?
That I may publish with the voice of thanksgiving, and tell of all thy wondrous works. - Psalm 26
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Re: Public health as an international matter

Postby different glory » December 4th, 2014, 3:02 am

And then there's drug-resistant TB. I have to get to work now, but I'll be back... :)
That I may publish with the voice of thanksgiving, and tell of all thy wondrous works. - Psalm 26
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Re: Public health as an international matter

Postby Lyn » December 4th, 2014, 11:40 am

Drug resistant TB isn't anything new and Streptomycin often has the side effect of causing deafness which is why it is used so rarely. It is possible for TB to just go away however, with proper care and nutrition. That's why we so rarely hear of people dying of TB in this country, it's not just because of drugs and innoculation.
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Re: Public health as an international matter

Postby different glory » December 9th, 2014, 3:32 am

That's heartening, VP. I recall when TB was the focus of a major public health campaign in Australia - chest x-rays of (as I seem to recall - I was very little) the whole adult population, with x-ray vans set up at local shopping centres etc, and the big sanitorium (with extensive park-like grounds) for TB patients.

Antibiotic resistance is a brewing problem, though.
That I may publish with the voice of thanksgiving, and tell of all thy wondrous works. - Psalm 26
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Re: Public health as an international matter

Postby Lyn » December 9th, 2014, 9:46 am

It's the same here dg but generally amongst the very poor, in the case of the UK it seems to mainly affect those who are homeless, who doss down in hostels etc, drink a lot and don't look after themselves. Plenty of people still get TB but are generally clear of infection in a few months with no after effects.

When I was a child (maybe about 4), I remember an older cousin having TB and everyone begging her to go away to the hospital - sanitorium I suppose it was called. She didn't want to. She did go eventually and a bit later on developed TB again, this time a lump appeared in her neck area. However she recovered, went on to marry and have kids and lived a reasonably long life.

In my era (and yours), we had the BCG given to us routinely at school so we were safe. I've had it more than once (more than twice I think), because of working in hospitals.

(Edited for typo)
Last edited by Lyn on December 10th, 2014, 2:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Public health as an international matter

Postby Bev » December 9th, 2014, 5:47 pm

Heard on the news yesterday that Merck, a big Pharma corp here, is buying another pharma that has produced several super antibiotics. Good news that a company has developed a better antibiotic. Bad news that Merck acquires it, which means the treatment will be uber expensive. Over here, even with the ACA (Affordable Care Act) that means a lot of poor wouldn't be able to afford it.
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