Minimum wage increase

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A place for serious discussion on any non-religious topic

Minimum wage increase

Postby Pondero » January 10th, 2018, 9:44 pm

I have never heard such nonsense on TV over a minimum wage increase of 21% ( $11.60 to $14.00).on Jan 1st 2018.
You would think small businessmen are about to go into bankruptcy,to hear them talk. And they say Premier Wynne will regret the additional dollar increase on $14.00 effective Jan 1st 2019. A further 7% increase.
These minimum wage increases are designed to give the worker a liveable wage. It is still not enough, but it is a start. Any thoughts I had of becoming a Conservative supporter have rapidly disappeared. Not on moral grounds alone, but for economic reasons. A weekly wage of $560 from $464 after working 40 hours dispensing coffee and donuts is not a liveable wage in metro Toronto.And that is before deductions .
Our media which encourages such criticism makes me sick.
Has no one heard of raising the prices of coffee and donuts. I know that the wholesale price of coffee declined recently, but no one is speaking about that.Even so, the clientele of Tim Hortons can afford an increase in their timbits, and until tested you will not know how high to increase the price. Coffee and donuts are an inelastic commodity, like alcohol is for some folks, even more so I think. The end result will be no loss in profit for the franchise holders, greedy so and so that they appear to be by cutting out paid coffee breaks for their workers. I don't need to take three courses in economics at university like level to know that.
According to one study, the average adult has a shorter attention span (eight seconds) than a goldfish (nine seconds).
This is not surprising in today's wired , or wified world.
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Re: Minimum wage increase

Postby Lyn » January 11th, 2018, 1:02 am

The minimum wage here is £7.05 per hour which, as in Canada, is not enough. £253.08 per week for 36 hour week. Certainly not enough for someone to live independently in the London area or other big cities, though it is quite amazing how some (usually young) people manage, sharing houses etc.
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Re: Minimum wage increase

Postby Val » January 11th, 2018, 11:56 am

Here we seeming do not have a strict minimum wage but low paid workers work for less than 8 Euros per hour, our government increased the old age pension at last budget by 5 Euros per week to start at the end of March 2018, they gave all ministers and others in the government an extra 3,500 Euros per year, some of these useless people are on an incomes of € 190,000 plus expenses

Our Garda (police) get a wage of € 23,250 starting off and for the first 4 years same with teachers €23,000, in the city 2 bedroom houses cost € 2,250 per month with no parking, single rooms cost anywhere around € 900 pm, outside City limits say 20 kilometres 3 bed houses cost € 1,700 per month and the cost is rising as housing becomes scarse, we do not have anywhere enough social housing and at the moment we have 8,000 low paid working people and unemployed registered as homeless most of these are put up in hotels paid in part by the government, its bloody awful these families with children have to vacate their rooms for about 3-4 hours every day while their rooms are cleaned.
It is a bloody mess
“Bad men need nothing more to compass their ends, than that good men should look on and do nothing.”
John Stuart Mill

“The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.”
Edmund Burke
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Re: Minimum wage increase

Postby Lyn » January 12th, 2018, 7:52 pm

Yes it is :( .

In London a police officer's starting salary is £27,015 + £2,373 (London Weighting)

A newly qualified primary school teacher earns £22,917, or £28,660 inner London

Secondary school teacher around £28,951.

The salaries do go up of course and there are many opportunities to earn more but one can see how difficult it is for young people to get on the housing ladder.
Some get help from parents and grandparents.
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Re: Minimum wage increase

Postby Pondero » January 14th, 2018, 10:33 am

You are right about getting help from parents or grandparents,Lyn usually in the form of Christmas gifts but in our case they didn't ask for the money and didn't expect it; Life is full of surprises.
Older relatives suffer hardships and we made outstanding loans to them before Christmas too. In one case the County of Hastings. Up North threatened to seize a relative's cottage for non payment of outstanding property taxes by December 22, unless paid. We paid them. The bank cut them off.
However, the bank of Pondero makes interest free loans with unspecified repayment dates.
Surely, I can afford to fly down here and rent a car for five or six weeks in future. I am not driving down here again.
According to one study, the average adult has a shorter attention span (eight seconds) than a goldfish (nine seconds).
This is not surprising in today's wired , or wified world.
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Re: Minimum wage increase

Postby Lyn » January 14th, 2018, 11:20 am

It's good that nobody asked and didn't expect, makes it all the more good that you anticipated the need and dug into your pocket. I am like that too, when younger John and I were so hard up and struggling, it was dreadful, and being as we are now is a great gift. I certainly thank God for it because although we both worked hard, I stopped at 51 due to ill health and the pair of us were always quite naive and, in some people's eyes, rather stupid about money. Yet God has seen fit to decide we deserve a comfortable old age - even when not so old, whilst in our fifties everything seemed to come together and we were comfortable.

We only have one child and he earns well but anything he needs he can have if not at the moment (plenty in past!); we have been able to help others anonymously at times. It's a privilege to do so. I wouldn't usually talk about finances (very unEnglish!) so it ends here :) .

Most people do what they can though, within their means. I've been very touched at what people do for others, quite unconditionally.

None of that takes away from the minimum wage being far too little. Might be OK for a young person still living at home with parents but certainly not for anyone else.

Apprenticeships are an excellent idea. Used to be called Youth Opportunities Programme (YOP), and many young people did well because of them and went on to be quite successful.
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Re: Minimum wage increase

Postby greenjack » February 15th, 2018, 12:57 pm

Lyn wrote:Apprenticeships are an excellent idea. Used to be called Youth Opportunities Programme (YOP), and many young people did well because of them and went on to be quite successful.

Quite agree Lyn, although I have mixed feelings about the YOP schemes, it certainly worked for me. The YOP wasn't a true apprenticeship. They weren't obliged to train you as such, nor give you a job at the end of it. Many of my freinds were just laid off at the end of their year on YOP.
However I was fortunate enough to be placed with someone who recognised an ability in me for medical sciences and so he also enrolled me on a day release ONC course in Med Lab Sciences. It set my career up! When I applied for a true apprenticeship (trainee) post I was the only applicant out of about 80 that had a years work experience and half the ONC under my belt. All the others were school leavers. And here I still am, 36 years later, Cytopathology manager at NHS band 8a level . So no complaints.
And while I recognise the achievement that a degree is, it has it's down sides. No gurantee of a job, massive student debt, plus most have to really start training once they do get a job and in some cases they are not always suited to the work. You can't really get an idea of what the job is like in the classroom. A bit too late by then to consider a change of career direction.
I notice that apprenticeship type training is now becoming more popular :thumbsup:
Cheers
GJ
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Re: Minimum wage increase

Postby Lyn » March 14th, 2018, 4:14 pm

It is indeed. Recently it was said to me that it's a way of getting cheap labour and the government can state that less people are unemployed :( , a cynical way of looking at it but has a strong ring of truth. However really good and determined candidates at least have something on their cv when they apply for jobs, certainly better than doing nothing and they are earning something. There's no guarantee of work after a degree & degree students don't earn anything, they have to pay to learn! Graduates are sometimes offered internships afterwards - very popular in America - which also don't guarantee a job. Can't win really.
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