Why Remember the Saints?

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Why Remember the Saints?

Postby Theophilus » October 30th, 2007, 11:17 am

"That in the ages to come He might show the exceeding riches of His Grace" (Ephesians 2:7).

With the prophetic gift, the Apostle Paul predicted the riches of God's Grace which, throughout the ages, will be poured out on the generations of mankind. We who live nearly twenty centuries separated from the apostle can attest to that which the apostle prophesied in ages past. Just as beehives are filled with valuable and honey-bearing bees, so all the centuries from Christ until today are filled with praiseworthy men, virgins and women.

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O how abundantly the richness of the Grace of God manifested itself on countless souls who, at first, were sinful and later became holy!

O how abundantly the richness of the Grace of God manifested itself on men and women who were, at first, weak and fearful and after that heroically confessed Christ the Lord and joyfully suffered for Him!

O how abundantly the richness of the Grace of God manifested itself throughout the centuries on the simple and illiterate who, after that, became true wisemen and spiritual generals of the faithful armies of Christ!

O Most Holy Trinity, our mankind-loving God, uplift our hearts that we continually glorify and praise the exceeding great richness of Your Grace.

To You be glory and thanks always. Amen.

(+St. Nikolai of Ohrid)

I hope that on this board we can - amongst other things - dicover the Grace of God revealed to the world in the lives of His Saintly, Martyrs, Theologians, Fools-for-Christ, Prophets, and Wonderworkers.
Last edited by Theophilus on September 22nd, 2012, 12:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Why Remember the Saints?

Postby Pondero » November 1st, 2007, 9:40 am

Prophetic, isn't it, Theo that you write just before All Saints Day. The day when all saints are honoured.

We don't pay enough attention to the saints, and they can help us in our daily journey towards heaven, by praying for us, together with our Guardian Angel, who watches over us at all times.
I ask for the intercession of the saints daily.

The church I will attend for this morning's mass is called All Saints Church.
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Saint Nicholas

Postby Theophilus » December 6th, 2007, 1:03 am

The Feast of Saint Nicholas
December 6th
Saint Nicholas, the fourth-centurybishop of Myra in Lycia who through the ages has come to be especially connected with the festival of Christ’s birth.

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Hymn of Praise

Holy Father Nicholas,
The four corners of the world glorify you
As a knight of the powerful Faith,
The Faith of God, the true Faith.
From the cradle he was devoted to God,
From the cradle until the end;
And God glorified him-His faithful Nicholas.
Famous was he throughout his life,
And even more renowned after death;
Mighty on earth was he,
And even more mighty is he in heaven.
Glowing spirit, pure heart,
He was a temple of the Living God;
For this the people glorify him
As a wondrous saint.
Nicholas, rich in glory,
Loves those who honor him as their "Krsna Slava'';
Before the throne of the eternal God,
He prays for their good.
O Nicholas, bless us,
Bless your people
Who, before God and before you,
Humbly stand in prayer.


Sad as it is to see Saint Nicholas transformed into the red-suited SantaClaus of the secular winter “holidays,” it is easy to understand why the holy bishop has become so closely connected with the festival of Christ’s birth. The stories about the saint, fabricated and embroidered in Christian imagination over the ages, in various times and places, all tell of the simple faith and love of the man known only for his goodness and love.The extraordinary thing about the image of Saint Nicholas in the Church is that he is not known for anything extraordinary. He was not a theologian and never wrote a word, yet he is famous in the memory of believers as a zealot for orthodoxy, allegedly accosting the heretic Arius at the first ecumenical council in Nicaea for denying the divinity of God’s Son. He was not an ascetic and did no outstanding feats of fasting and vigils, yet he is praised for his possession of the “fruit of the Holy Spirit . . . love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness,faithfulness, gentleness, self-control” (Gal 5:22-23). He was not a mystic in our present meaning of the term but he lived daily with the Lord and was godly in all of his words and deeds. He was not a prophet in the technical sense, yet he proclaimed the Word of God, exposed the sins of the wicked, defended the rights of the oppressed and afflicted, and battled against every form of injustice with supernatural compassionand mercy. In a word, he was a good pastor, father, and bishop to his flock, known especially for his love and care for the poor.

Most simply put, he was a divinely good person. We use that term “goodness” so lightly in our time. How easily we say of someone, “He is a good man” or “She is a good woman.” How lightly we say, “They are good people.” A teen-age girl takes an overdose of drugs,and the neighbors tell the reporters, “But she was always such a good girl, and her parents are such nice people!” A young man commits someterrible crime, and the same rhetoric flows: “But he was always such a good boy, and his family is so nice.” A man dies on the golf course after a life distinguished by many years of profit-taking and martini-drinking, and the reaction is the same: “He was a good man, yeah, a real nice guy.” What do “good” and “nice” really mean in such cases? What do they describe? What do they express?In Saint Luke’s gospel it tells us that one day a “ruler” came up to Jesus and asked, “Good Teacher, what shall I do to inherit eternal life? And Jesus answered him, “Why do you call Me good? No one is good but God alone” (Lk 18:18; see also Mk 10:18). In Saint Matthew’s version itsays that Jesus answered the man by saying, “Why do you ask Me about what is good? One there is who is good” (Mt 19:17). However we choose to interpret Christ’s words, at least one point is clear. Jesus reacts to the facile, perhaps even sarcastic, use of the term “good” by referring it to its proper source. There is only One who is good, and that is God Himself. If you want to speak of goodness, then you must realize what—and Whom- you are talking about! Like God, and like Jesus, Saint Nicholas was genuinely good.

Real goodness is possible. For, to quote the Lord again, “with men this is impossible, but with God all things are possible” (Mt 19:26). A human being, even a rich human being who believes in God, can be genuinely good with God’s own goodness. “For truly I say to you,” says the Lord,“if you have faith as a grain of mustard seed . . - nothing will be impossible to you” (Mt 17:20-21).The Messiah has come so that human beings can live lives which are, strictly speaking, humanly impossible. He has come so that people can really be good. One of the greatest and most beloved examples among believers that this is true is the holy bishop of Myra about whom almost nothing else is known, or needs to be known, except that he was good.For this reason alone he remains, even in his secularized form, the very spirit of Christmas.

0 holy father,
The fruit of your good deeds has enlightened and delighted the hearts ofthe faithful.
Who cannot wonder at your measureless patience and humility?
At your graciousness to the poor?
At your compassion for the afflicted?
O Bishop Nicholas, You have divinely taught all things well, And now wearing your unfading crown, you intercede for our souls.


You appeared to your flock as a rule of faith,
An image of humility and a teacher of abstinence.
Because of your lowliness, heaven was opened to you.
Because of your poverty, riches were granted to you.
O holy Bishop Nicholas,
Pray to Christ our God to save our souls.


Taken from, “The Winter Pascha” by Protopresbyter Thomas Hopko
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Re: Why Remember the Saints?

Postby Pondero » December 6th, 2007, 11:17 am

One saint, not yet canonized, but made Venerable, is Father Solanus Casey, a Capuchin, who was born on November 25, 1870 on a farm in Wisconsin. His Irish immigrant parents named him Bernard. He was the sixth child in a family of ten boys and six girls. After he left the farm he worked throughout Wisconsin and Minnesota as a logger, a hospital orderly, a street car operator and a prison guard.

At the age of twenty-one, Bernard entered St. Francis High School Seminary in Milwaukee to study for the diocesan priesthood. Five years later he decided to enter a religious order. He was invested in the Capuchin Order at Detroit in 1897 and received his religious name of Solanus.

After his ordination in 1904, Father Solanus spent 20 years in New York, Harlem and Yonkers. In 1924 he was sent to St.Bonaventure Monastery, Detroit where he worked for 20 years. In 1945 he returned to New York for one year. He was assigned to Huntingdon, Indiana from 1946 to 1956. He was reasssigned to St. Bonaventure in 1956.

Father Solanus spent his life in the service of people. At the monastery door, he met thousands of persons from every age and walk of life. In time of trouble and sorrow, they sought his prayers and advice. Many attributed favors to his prayers. He constantly showed his love of God by loving all of God's people. He was always ready and willing to listen to anyone any time of the day or night. In return he asked people to love and support the missions.

During his final illness, he remarked: "I'm offering my sufferings that all might be one. If only I could see the conversion of the whole world." His last conscious act was to sit up in bed and exclaim:"I give my soul to Jesus Christ." He died in Detroit at the age of 86 on July 31,1957 and is buried at St. Bonaventure Monastery.
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Re: Why Remember the Saints?

Postby flying finn » December 6th, 2007, 5:19 pm

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Holy Father John of Kronstadt

Postby Theophilus » December 7th, 2007, 10:21 am

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Saint John of Kronstadt was a married priest, who lived with his wife in virginity. Through his untiring labours in his priestly duties and love for the poor and sinners, he was granted by our Lord great gifts of clairvoyance and miracle - working, to such a degree that in the last years of his life miracles of healings - both of body and of soul - were performed countless times each day through his prayers, often for people who had only written to him asking his help. During his lifetime he was known throughout Russia, as well as in the Western world. He has left us his diary My Life in Christ as a spiritual treasure for Christians of every age; simple in language, it expounds the deepest mysteries of our Faith with that wisdom which is given only to a heart purified by the grace of the Holy Spirit. Foreseeing as a true prophet the Revolution Of 1917, he unsparingly rebuked the growing apostasy among the people; he foretold that the very name of Russia would be changed. As the darkness of unbelief grew thicker, he shone forth as a beacon of unquenchable piety, comforting the faithful through the many miracles that he worked and the fatherly love and simplicity with which he received all. Saint John reposed in peace in 1908.

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Re: Why Remember the Saints?

Postby hughm » December 7th, 2007, 12:36 pm

Great stuff Theo

The saints remind us that the ordinary can become quite extraordinary if we have faith and love enough

God bless

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God bless

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Re: Why Remember the Saints?

Postby Pondero » December 8th, 2007, 11:54 am

Today, is the feast day of The Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary, and it is a Holy Day of obligation in the USA, but, not in Canada. I am going to Mass to celebrate it anyway.

My going to Mass will be followed, unfortunately by a trip to the dentist to have a tooth root extracted. Such is life.
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Re: Why Remember the Saints?

Postby flying finn » December 8th, 2007, 2:12 pm

It's a holy day of obligation just about everywhere else aswell. I wonder why not so in Canada? Have the bishops ever given a reason?
Pondero wrote:Today, is the feast day of The Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary, and it is a Holy Day of obligation in the USA, but, not in Canada. I am going to Mass to celebrate it anyway.
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Re: Why Remember the Saints?

Postby Pondero » December 8th, 2007, 6:52 pm

flying finn wrote:It's a holy day of obligation just about everywhere else aswell. I wonder why not so in Canada? Have the bishops ever given a reason?
Pondero wrote:Today, is the feast day of The Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary, and it is a Holy Day of obligation in the USA, but, not in Canada. I am going to Mass to celebrate it anyway.


It is not a Holy Day of Obligation in England and Wales and a glance at the countries of the world shows only the USA has it, that I can find on the websites. However, the websites seem to give different answers to the question of what is a Holy Day of Obligation in Canada, and I can find nothing about this on the website of the Archdioces of Toronto. Therefore, I simply am not sure and will cancel what I have previously written in the interests of accuracy.
Last edited by Pondero on December 9th, 2007, 11:32 am, edited 1 time in total.
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