Scotch

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Scotch

Postby GregB » January 26th, 2018, 8:41 am

On the Pope's visit to Ireland thread in the About Christianity section, there have recently been some comments about the word Scotch as applied to the natives of that country as well as the whisky. That got me thinking about the 3M company's product, Scotch Tape, and why it is has that name. Here's the (curious) explanation from Wikipedia:

"The use of the term Scotch in the name was a pejorative meaning "stingy" in the 1920s and 1930s. The brand name Scotch came about around 1925 while Richard Drew was testing his first masking tape to determine how much adhesive he needed to add. The bodyshop painter became frustrated with the sample masking tape and exclaimed, "Take this tape back to those Scotch bosses of yours and tell them to put more adhesive on it!" The name was soon applied to the entire line of 3M tapes."

This got me wondering about the origin of the name Scotch Eggs (boiled eggs coated in sausage meat and breadcrumbs and then fried), but the Wikipedia article on them didn't supply an explanation of the name's origin.

Returning to whisky (always a good idea!), 'Scotch on the rocks' means Scotch whisky poured over ice cubes, of course. If the Scottish economy ever crashed, would that be 'Scots on the rocks'?
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Re: Scotch

Postby Sprocket » January 26th, 2018, 9:15 am

Scotch on the rocks is barbaric, as is anything else added to Scotch (or to which Scotch is added). Scots traditionally are supposed to be physically hardy as well as mean, and I'd guess that Scotch eggs were originally meant as a convenient food which could be carried in one's sporran while out herding sheep or killing members of the neighbouring clan.
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Re: Scotch

Postby Lyn » January 26th, 2018, 9:39 am

Scotch eggs, from Quora:
"Scotch egg is actually a modern abbreviation of 'scotched' egg, which is it's true name. Scotching meat involves hacking it to either tenderise, or roughly mince, which refers to the sausage meat surrounding the egg. Something that is scotched is now generally regarded as being coated in breadcrumbs and fried, too."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scotch_egg

So nothing to do with Scotland.

The wiki article talks about Scotch eggs served hot with veg and gravy. My mum used to make perfect Scotch eggs like that, I loved them.

The ones bought in delis and supermarkets always seem to lack flavour by comparison with my mother's ones.

You can still buy Scotch tape with a tartan pattern in the packaging.
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Re: Scotch

Postby Sprocket » January 26th, 2018, 1:49 pm

Well, you say "nothing to do with Scotland", but the next question is why chopped meat is called "scotched"...
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Re: Scotch

Postby Lyn » January 26th, 2018, 1:54 pm

Definition of 'Scotch' and 'Scotched' from dictionary.com:

scotch1
skɒtʃ/Submit
verb
past tense: scotched; past participle: scotched
1.
decisively put an end to.
"a spokesman has scotched the rumours"
synonyms: put an end to, put a stop to, bring to an end, nip in the bud, put the lid on; More
2.
wedge (someone or something) somewhere.
"he soon scotched himself against a wall"
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Re: Scotch

Postby GregB » January 26th, 2018, 6:10 pm

The origin of 'scotch' as a verb has nothing to do with the country:
According to Etymonline, scotch means: "stamp out, crush," 1825, earlier "make harmless for a time" (1798; a sense that derives from the reading of "Macbeth" III.ii.13), from scocchen "to cut, score, gash" (early 15c.), perhaps from Anglo-Fr. escocher, O.Fr. cocher "to notch, nick," from coche "a notch, groove," perhaps from L. coccum "berry of the scarlet oak," which appears notched, from Gk. kokkos. Related: Scotched; scotching.
Last edited by GregB on January 26th, 2018, 6:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Scotch

Postby Lyn » January 26th, 2018, 6:54 pm

Exactly (but Sprocket knew that anyway and was just throwing a spanner in the works for fun).
Now - what about 'Scotch Mist'?
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Re: Scotch

Postby Pondero » January 27th, 2018, 11:34 pm

Talking about scotch whiskey, I have the Canadian equivalent lying on the carpet floor here. I have three one litre bottles of Canadian Club, which we are going to take back to Canada with us. Unless of course my son takes one. That leaves us space for one litre of wine which will then be the limit of duty free alcohol we can take with us when we cross the border at Detroit.
According to one study, the average adult has a shorter attention span (eight seconds) than a goldfish (nine seconds).
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Re: Scotch

Postby Sprocket » January 29th, 2018, 1:52 pm

Brendan Behan once went on a lecture tour of Canada. On his arrival, a reporter asked him why he'd come to Canada. Behan replied "I saw an advert that said 'Drink Canada Dry', and I thought 'I'll try anything once!'"
Treason doth never prosper: what's the reason?
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Re: Scotch

Postby Pondero » January 29th, 2018, 2:22 pm

:grin:
I doubt that Brendan could finish a litre of Canadian Club Premium Whiskey in one day....and remain standing.
According to one study, the average adult has a shorter attention span (eight seconds) than a goldfish (nine seconds).
This is not surprising in today's wired , or wified world.
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