Game for International Book Week

Reviews, recommendations, books to avoid. What have you been reading?
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Reviews, recommendations, books to avoid. What have you been reading?

Re: Game for International Book Week

Postby Lyn » September 24th, 2012, 11:35 am

There were female Jesuits for a while, maybe 15th C, then the Pope put a stop to them. I presume they were nuns. However the quote may be from a more recent, humourous book, about religious orders. Or more likely about groups of women who behave like Jesuits.
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Re: Game for International Book Week

Postby Palaeologus » September 24th, 2012, 12:15 pm

No, there weren't, he didn't, and the Jesuits werem't founded until the 16th century. :mrgreen:

Anyway the quote is from Volume 3 of Casanova's memoirs.

Theo's might be from St Silouan. Or it might be Dostoyevsky.
Concepts create idols; only wonder grasps anything.
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Re: Game for International Book Week

Postby GregB » September 24th, 2012, 1:12 pm

Anyway the quote is from Volume 3 of Casanova's memoirs.

The mind boggles at what the complete context of the remark might reveal (whores whispering casuistical commentaries during carnal cavortings?)
Theo's might be from St Silouan. Or it might be Dostoyevsky.

Does it have to be restricted to an Orthodox saint or an Orthodox sinner? (And did St. Silouan really have such a conflictive youth or baneful influence on his fellows?)
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Re: Game for International Book Week

Postby Lyn » September 24th, 2012, 1:20 pm

Palaeologus wrote:No, there weren't, he didn't, and the Jesuits werem't founded until the 16th century. :mrgreen:

Anyway the quote is from Volume 3 of Casanova's memoirs.

Theo's might be from St Silouan. Or it might be Dostoyevsky.


Sorry Pal, you are of course right that the Jesuits were not formed until 16th C but there were women Jesuits for a short while. I was relying on my memory but googled this: http://867questions.blogspot.co.uk/2005 ... esuit.html There is probably more information online too but I couldn't be bothered. Anyway we are going off the point a bit. Back to the quotation or, more precisely, Theo's quote.

I don't think it is St Augustine, more inclined towards a modern philospher/theologian which is why I thought of Thomas Merton. I shall eat my hat if it turns out to be someone ancient like Plato.
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Re: Game for International Book Week

Postby Sprocket » September 24th, 2012, 1:46 pm

Meanwhile, my second go, from a book I'm reading atm, which is why it was the closest:
The river provides the most frequent images - natural enough for a poet who lived all his early years beside the Avon, came back to it to spend some part of most summers, and eventually retired to live his last days beside it.

Not too difficult to work out who's being referred to, but what's the book? Anyone?
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Why, if it prosper, none dare call it treason.
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Re: Game for International Book Week

Postby Bev » September 24th, 2012, 2:22 pm

Shakespeare. :)

I've been enjoying the posts on FB in response to this. Our resident Hedgewitch changed the reason on his to "It's not quite International Book Week, but..." :lol:

From the book nearest me, atm...

"Now I presume that if that apostle had known that providence would at an after day be so kind to any particular set of people as to furnish them with other means of extinguishing their fire than those of matrimony, he would have earnestly recommended them to their practice."

I'll be surprised if anyone comes close to a guess on this one. Well, maybe the Facebookers might. :grin:
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Re: Game for International Book Week

Postby GregB » September 24th, 2012, 2:38 pm

I've been enjoying the posts on FB in response to this. Our resident Hedgewitch changed the reason on his to "It's not quite International Book Week, but..."

[All right, deleted.]

Steve asked which book, not just who was being referred to. Well, for starters at least, how about something by A.L.Rowse?
Last edited by GregB on September 24th, 2012, 7:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Game for International Book Week

Postby Bev » September 24th, 2012, 3:22 pm

deleted
Last edited by Bev on September 25th, 2012, 12:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Game for International Book Week

Postby Sprocket » September 24th, 2012, 3:43 pm

GregB wrote:...how about something by A.L.Rowse?

Spot on! 'William Shakespeare: a Biography' by him, published in 1963, and, according to the blurb, the first biography of Shakespeare by a historian, as opposed to a literary scholar.
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Re: Game for International Book Week

Postby GregB » September 24th, 2012, 4:19 pm

Bev wrote:Yes, I mean he's posting on Facebook and not here, which after you're post, I can certainly understand why. :roll:

What the hell is that supposed to mean? I have never posted anything at all negative about him before now - just the opposite. He has had a loyal, interested, sympathetic following here which, in the end, he's just ignored, and I really don't like that.

Glad I was spot on, Steve. ;) I knew Rowse was perhaps the leading British Shakespeare scholar of our time (and going back decades with that) so I just put two and two together.
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