What are you cooking for dinner?

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Cooking it, growing it, eating it. Tell us your favourite recipes and tips, or ask for ideas.

What are you cooking for dinner?

Postby Lyn » July 10th, 2009, 5:43 pm

Since John has been working up in Norfolk I don't cook much but on Friday (& over the weekend), I cook really nice things. I usually freeze a couple of things for him to take up with him, like a ragu sauce or chunky chicken and vegetable soup, some of which I made yesterday. He is weight watching and being very good but over the weekend he has something he fancies.

Tonight I am cooking belly of pork and roast vegetables. The pork is in the oven and smells gorgeous. I have lots of stuff under the meat (celery, red and white onions, carrot, turnip, garlic, thyme) to make the gravy. I have quite an assortment of vegetables to roast and am wondering what to put on them to season, maybe honey and mustard or chili powder. I am quite hungry as it smells so good. John should be home in about an hour but it won't be ready until half an hour or so after that.

We will have fruit for pudding, nectarine, banana and apple, with fromage frais.
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Re: What are you cooking for dinner?

Postby Keturah » July 10th, 2009, 5:46 pm

It all sounds absolutely delicious!

No cooking here tonight. It was a fish, chip and mushy pea take-away. Yum. :D
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Re: What are you cooking for dinner?

Postby Lyn » July 10th, 2009, 5:53 pm

I like fish and chips, we often have them when we come home from Norfolk because it is usually about 7.30pm or 8pm by the time we get near home and neither of us wants to cook then. I never enjoy it quite as much as I think I am going to these days. Maybe it is old age creeping on, fish and chips was my favourite food when I was a kid.

My mum also used to cook lovely fish and chips - something I never do. I do cook fish, like salmon, and very occasionally deep fry chips (not this year I think), but not cod or haddock in batter. I might do it one Friday and make beer batter which is supposed to be very good. Might even try to make mushy peas which I have never fancied but John likes.
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Re: What are you cooking for dinner?

Postby Keturah » July 10th, 2009, 5:58 pm

I adore mushy peas. To make them from scratch takes forever - all that soaking. Much easier to buy the frozen variety. ;)

In the past I've made beer batter and it was so light and crispy. Nowadays I prefer unbattered fish.

Tonight's meal should have been salmon, but we'll have it tomorrow instead. I've just realised I've had a very fishy week! Hubby has been away and one night I did fish pie and last night I had mackeral. I like fish. :lol: :lol:
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Re: What are you cooking for dinner?

Postby Lyn » July 10th, 2009, 9:37 pm

Very good for you, mackerel is particularly.
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Re: What are you cooking for dinner?

Postby Sprocket » July 10th, 2009, 9:41 pm

Tony Blair, in the early years of his Premiership, decided to promote his 'man of the people' image by visiting a traditional fish-and-chip shop oop north somewhere. He ordered battered cod and chips, and then, pointing to the mushy peas, said "...and I'll have some of that guacamole with it", which rather spoiled the effect.
(Disclaimer: the above probably isn't true.)

[edit]Curious fact I've just discovered from the Wikipedia entry on Guacamole: 'avocado' is Italian for 'lawyer' (i.e. 'advocate'), and I always assumed that the savoury fruit so-called was so-called because it was rich and expensive, and therefore liked by lawyers, who, as everyone knows, are over-paid, thieving bastards ("Let's kill all the lawyers!" - Shakespeare, King Lear (I think )), which is why the rich egg flip known in Holland as 'advocaat' is also named after them. However, the original Aztec name for the fruit was 'ahuacatl', which is similar to 'avocado', so it would seem that the Italians simply corrupted the Aztec name into an Italian word that they were familiar with (though I'm sure that the real or imagined sybaritic tendencies of lawyers also played a part in the transformation).
Brendan Behan once went on a lecture tour of Canada. On his arrival, a reporter asked him why he'd come to Canada. Behan replied "I saw an advert that said 'Drink Canada Dry', and I thought 'I'll try anything once!'"
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Re: What are you cooking for dinner?

Postby Sweet Peace » July 10th, 2009, 11:54 pm

( Here, in the rainforest nearby, we have a climbing vine called Wait-a-While or Lawyer Vine as one it gets its hooks into you it's hard to disentangle yourself.)
Where sin abounded, grace did much more abound.
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Re: What are you cooking for dinner?

Postby Lyn » July 11th, 2009, 10:25 pm

Ket has enlightened me, I didn't know you could buy mushy peas frozen. I have seen them in a tin but don't fancy those. Actually I don't fancy mushy peas at all :D but if I see a packet - which I never have - I might try them, doctor them up a bit so they look home made. I also had no idea that it takes a long time to make mushy peas, shows how ignorant I am. It's not a dish that is that well known down south although more people here eat them than used to. One of the TV chefs, can't remember who, put them in a dish once and they became quite popular for a while. I didn't see the programme, someone told me, so I am still ignorant as to how to cook them. I shall have to investigate. I know John would like them.

Found this by Heston Blumenthal:

475g frozen peas (I like Birds Eye)
65g butter
6 mint leaves
Salt and pepper, to taste

1 Defrost the frozen peas in a large pot filled with cool water — this should take a only few minutes. Strain, shaking off as much excess water as possible.

2 Reserve about one-fifth of the peas.Place the remaining peas into a sauté pan, along with the butter and 50ml water. Cook over a medium heat until all the water has evaporated and the peas are cooked through. If your water is very hard, it would be best to buy some bottled water (or, even better, de-ionized car-battery water) to use when cooking the peas, as this will help to keep their colour bright green.

3 Place the cooked peas into a blender (or use a stick blender) and purée. While blending, adjust the taste by adding the mint leaves and the salt and pepper.

4 Fold in the reserved peas and serve.

So basically they are pureed peas with some seasoning.
There was another recipe which used dried marrowfat peas which need soaking and apparently the mush goes greeny grey.
Yeuch.
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Re: What are you cooking for dinner?

Postby GregB » July 13th, 2009, 7:35 pm

Getting back to fish, it's well known that salmon, tuna, sardines, mackerel and other fish rich in Omega-3 oil are excellent for the heart and as antioxidants. Nuts of various kinds also have these properties and recently, a Spanish cardiologist of world renown now practising in California, Dr. Valentin Fuster, said a small, daily portion of salmon as well as just 8-10 walnuts a day (apparently the richest in the oil) can work wonders to keep the heart in good condition.

I'm not too keen on salmon myself, finding its flavour rather strong (though I do buy a jar of salmon conserved in oil now and then to eat on a salad), but I love tuna and every morning, I have a piece of multi-cereal toast spread with tomato, olive oil and a tin of tuna - delicious! My usual afternoon snack is two or three pieces of dark chocolate (85% cacao) with a handful of walnuts (I'm very fond of almonds and hazelnuts, too.) I fit in a tin of sardines somewhere in the day, as well. So, it seems I'm eating the right kind of things for my heart (always assuming I've got one, that is... :mrgreen: )
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- T.S.Eliot 'Four Quartets'.
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Re: What are you cooking for dinner?

Postby Bev » July 13th, 2009, 8:23 pm

It's wonderful to read that a doctor is promoting the nuts and salmon for heart-healthy advice! There is a doctor here in America named Perricone who has been writing and lecturing about the benefits of salmon, dark-meat turkey, and eggs combined with nutmeats and/or monounsaturated oils (olive and canola). He recommends one always add walnuts or almonds to the meal as the combined EFAs reduce inflammation, his big thing. He also recommends more dark-colored fruits and veggies. Lately, I've been accomplishing this in part by making smoothies with frozen mixed berries, greek yogurt, organic raw honey (the kind you can spread with a knife), a splash of keylime juice (I still have little frozen cubes in the freezer from last year's harvest) and a banana. I've also added either walnuts or almonds to the mix before pureeing. It's a great way to get your efa mix (the milk fat in the yogurt, and the nuts) and the fruits. Plus, I've been reading a lot about the probiotic benefit of the yogurt and honey combined.

The only thing, Greg, we're getting warnings here about tuna and heavy metals. I even have to be careful when buying EFA supplements to make sure they do not contain fish oils known to be high in heavy metals (mainly mercury :o ). Some of the research I've seen exempts salmon from the heavy-metal warning. Here, we can get a packaged, minced pink salmon that works very much like tuna for sandwich salads and for adding to casseroles. Also, from my grandmother's recipes, she would add to a can of red salmon: cracker crumbs, minced onion, chopped parsley, eggs, salt, pepper (I add Prudhomme's Vegetable or Seafood seasoning instead). You then form patties and lightly fries them. We eat them without anything else, but I'm sure one could eat them with a favorite condiment. For sandwiches, I mix a chopped hardboiled egg, finely diced onion and celery, salt, pepper, and mayonaise (I used a canola-oil mayonaise) with a package of minced pink salmon. This recipe has the complete EFAs coming from the salmon, the egg, and the canola oil.

Am visiting the oldest son and family for a few days, and Sat. night, he cooked a beer chicken. He seasoned a whole chicken (Emeril's Essence), turned it bottom-side down onto an open can of beer, and slowly cooked it on his closed grill (about an hour and a half). Unbelievable! :lol: The beer evaporates and steams up through to cook the chicken from the inside too. It cooks up so tender and juicy, and the flavor is wonderful.

Tonight, we're making yellow squash and green zucchini sliced, browned on both sides, sauteed garlic, salt, pepper added and all tossed with angle hair pasta. We're going to cut up some of the leftover chicken to add to the mix as well.
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