Sauerkraut

Cooking it, growing it, eating it. Tell us your favourite recipes and tips, or ask for ideas.
Forum rules
Cooking it, growing it, eating it. Tell us your favourite recipes and tips, or ask for ideas.

Sauerkraut

Postby Sprocket » July 3rd, 2012, 10:59 am

As I think I mentioned in the gardening thread, I harvested some cabbage yesterday, and was thinking of making sauerkraut with most of it, since I had far too much to use fresh. Well, this morning I've started it. I used a recipe in a book I've got on how to store your home-grown vegetables, plus another more detailed recipe which I found online (this one). I chopped up most of it, discarding the bottom ends of the stalks, and ended up with 2 1/2 pounds of cabbage, so I added the appropriate amount of salt (table salt, which is not ideal because it contains anti-caking agent, but it was all I had, so it'll have to do), thoroughly mixed it, and put the lot into a plastic tub I've got, which comes in handy for all sorts of things. I didn't have a suitably-sized plate to put on top, but then had a bright idea: I've got a number of large terracotta plantpots, some of which are broken since I knocked over a pile of them in the garden. The base is just the right size, so I took one of the broken ones whose base was still intact, carefully broke away the rest of the side with a hammer, and used that (after washing it thoroughly!), weighed down with a 1 lb iron weight from an old-fashioned scales, sealed inside a plastic freezer bag so that it didn't come into contact with the sk, which also covered up the hole in the plantpot bottom. It's all now in the larder, where it will, I hope, turn into sk over the next month or so.
Has anyone else ever made it? Any tips?
A cat once got frozen to -273 C, but it's 0k now.
User avatar
Sprocket
 
Posts: 15788
Joined: October 25th, 2007, 11:21 am
Location: Hemel Hempstead, Herts.

Re: Sauerkraut

Postby Sweet Peace » July 3rd, 2012, 11:52 pm

I've rarely eaten sauerkraut but my experience of sharing Christmas dinner with German friends was that Krauts love their sour. Many of the dishes were sour; even the pawpaw was prefered over-ripe. ISTM that the British aren't too far behind in liking sour tastes, but who ever goes for bitter tastes apart from chocolate and coffee?
(a sidetrack from the op - all the best with the sauerkraut, Sprocket.)
Where sin abounded, grace did much more abound.
User avatar
Sweet Peace
 
Posts: 4723
Joined: October 25th, 2007, 11:11 am
Location: Australia

Re: Sauerkraut

Postby Sprocket » July 4th, 2012, 7:03 am

Thanks. No sign of activity yet, but it's still early.
As for bitter tastes thast people like - you forgot beer! In Britain, one of the most popular styles of beer is called "bitter" (as a noun, as in "a pint of bitter").
A cat once got frozen to -273 C, but it's 0k now.
User avatar
Sprocket
 
Posts: 15788
Joined: October 25th, 2007, 11:21 am
Location: Hemel Hempstead, Herts.

Re: Sauerkraut

Postby Sweet Peace » July 4th, 2012, 9:34 pm

Of course, I'm rarely around any people drinking alcohol, (might make up for that with a week at my parents starting today :grin: )
Where sin abounded, grace did much more abound.
User avatar
Sweet Peace
 
Posts: 4723
Joined: October 25th, 2007, 11:11 am
Location: Australia

Re: Sauerkraut

Postby GregB » July 5th, 2012, 7:10 am

Will that include VB (Victoria Bitter), SP? ;) At least that's a good one of the non-British bottled beers, though the same can't be said of that gnat's piss called Budweiser.

Of course, apart from bitter beer, another drink with a bitter flavour is that which, in fact, is known as 'bitter', often drunk alone but also as a cocktail ingredient. The Cinzano brand contains alcohol though Bitter Kas, which is very popular here in Spain, is non-alcoholic and with ice and a slice of lemon (or orange) is a refreshing drink in hot weather - providing, of course, you like the bitter flavour! Here's the bottle, which is quite small - it's not a drink you would relish in great quantities:
http://packagingspain.com/wp-content/bitterkas.jpg
"The war of peoples will be more terrible than those of kings."
- Winston Churchill (1901)
User avatar
GregB
 
Posts: 15470
Joined: October 25th, 2007, 11:23 am
Location: Barcelona, Spain

Re: Sauerkraut

Postby Sprocket » July 5th, 2012, 7:15 am

Ah yes - as in Angostura Bitters. I bought a bottle of that once, out of curiosity. Vile stuff, I thought, but each to their own.
A cat once got frozen to -273 C, but it's 0k now.
User avatar
Sprocket
 
Posts: 15788
Joined: October 25th, 2007, 11:21 am
Location: Hemel Hempstead, Herts.

Re: Sauerkraut

Postby GregB » July 5th, 2012, 7:23 am

The brands I referred to are not as bitter as Angostura as that comes straight from the bark of the tree it's made from, or whatever, while those drinks are made with various blander flavouring ingredients (can't recall them offhand) in addition to a dash of bitters so the degree of bitterness is moderate. The colour - bright red - can be a bit offputting, though.
"The war of peoples will be more terrible than those of kings."
- Winston Churchill (1901)
User avatar
GregB
 
Posts: 15470
Joined: October 25th, 2007, 11:23 am
Location: Barcelona, Spain

Re: Sauerkraut

Postby 2ndRateMind » July 5th, 2012, 8:08 am

I love angostura bitters. Not neat of course, but in a long gin and tonic, or just in gin, or just in tonic. I sometimes run out of money, and when I do, angosturas in tonic is a nice 'pretend' alcoholic drink.

Cheers, 2RM.
User avatar
2ndRateMind
 
Posts: 873
Joined: November 5th, 2007, 5:57 pm
Location: In Contemplation

Re: Sauerkraut

Postby Sprocket » July 5th, 2012, 11:38 am

Well, according to Wikipedia, Angostura is 44%abv, so not particularly pretend alcoholic!
A cat once got frozen to -273 C, but it's 0k now.
User avatar
Sprocket
 
Posts: 15788
Joined: October 25th, 2007, 11:21 am
Location: Hemel Hempstead, Herts.

Re: Sauerkraut

Postby 2ndRateMind » July 5th, 2012, 1:56 pm

Sprocket wrote:Well, according to Wikipedia, Angostura is 44%abv, so not particularly pretend alcoholic!


Ah, yes, but one only needs dash. If that. I understand Navy pink gins are served 'in' or 'out', according to whether the dash of angosturas is left in the glass, or poured out again, after merely coating the inside surface. Whatever, I am sure the alcohol content left afterwards wouldn't trouble a tee-totaller, unless their objection was the principle, rather than the practice.

Cheers, 2RM.
User avatar
2ndRateMind
 
Posts: 873
Joined: November 5th, 2007, 5:57 pm
Location: In Contemplation

Next

Return to Food talk

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron