Allotment Allocation

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Cooking it, growing it, eating it. Tell us your favourite recipes and tips, or ask for ideas.

Allotment Allocation

Postby 2ndRateMind » July 4th, 2012, 1:37 pm

This is the most exciting thing to happen for a long-time! After 2 years plus, on the waiting list, I have finally signed an agreement with the council for an allotment! I've viewed the plot, and it's quite big, as allotments go, at 18m x 10m. I am allowed to keep chickens, rabbits and/or bees, as well as grow veg, herbs and fruit (on dwarf stock trees and bushes). So, from now on, I insist you all call me Farmer Rob! The plot has been fallow for at least 3 years, and probably longer, so there is some weed clearance to do. The only slight issue I have is the time of year; I might just get some salad leaves, spring onions, and such in, before the autumn. And I might be able to grow some winter crops like purple sprouting broccoli, and cabbages, and maybe some turnips. But, at least it gives me a good long lead time to get the plot ready for next year.

Any thoughts, comments and advice from all you gardening veterens would be welcome. The main reason I applied for the allotment was to grow berries and such to make wine out of, but there is so much space I'm now thinking in terms of an asparagus bed, as well as your normal 4 field rotation.

Best wishes, 2RM.
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Re: Allotment Allocation

Postby Sprocket » July 4th, 2012, 5:19 pm

You can plant first early spuds about now, for new spuds at Christmas, but you're probably best clearing the plot of weeds and planning what you're going to grow where for the rest of this year, and start sowing and planting in earnest next year. You could have a greenhouse on a plot that big, for toms etc. What kind of soil have you got?
When I get home (I'm at work atm), I'll remind myself of the titles and authors of my books on allotment gardening, and recommend them.
In the meantime, try Real Seeds if you want to grow rarer varieties, instead of just the boring old Ailsa Craigs and Onwards and Little Gems and Moneymakers.
Grats!
Treason doth never prosper: what's the reason?
Why, if it prosper, none dare call it treason.
Sir John Harington (1561-1620)
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Re: Allotment Allocation

Postby 2ndRateMind » July 5th, 2012, 9:15 am

That's a really useful site. Thanks Sprocket. There's quite a few things there I hadn't considered before, that I might have a shot at growing. Like quinoa, maybe, as a substitute for imported rice. I eat a lot of rice! And oca, just to see what it tastes like.

Cheers, 2RM.
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Re: Allotment Allocation

Postby Sprocket » July 5th, 2012, 11:35 am

My pleasure.
The books:

'How to Plant Your Allotment' by Caroline Foley, New Holland Publishers (UK) Ltd, ISBN 978 184537 616 1
Excellent for its suggested plans and plant lists for different types of plot - the big family plot, the high-speed plot, the Italian plot, the heritage plot, etc.

'The Allotment Book' by Andi Clevely, Collins, ISBN 978 0 00 727077 4
Widely regarded as the best general guide.
Treason doth never prosper: what's the reason?
Why, if it prosper, none dare call it treason.
Sir John Harington (1561-1620)
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Re: Allotment Allocation

Postby 2ndRateMind » July 5th, 2012, 1:45 pm

Thanks, Sprocket. Both books have gone straight onto my Amazon Wishlist.

Cheers, Farmer Rob.
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Re: Allotment Allocation

Postby Bev » July 5th, 2012, 11:40 pm

Congratulations, Farmer Rob! :yahoo:

Sprocket has posted on the gardening thread here for some time now. It might be very helpful to read through that. Sally too has contributed some helpful posts there.

On the quinoa, as it is native to South America, growing so far north might be challenging. A greenhouse sounds like a wonderful idea, though, and might be just what you need to grow it.
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Re: Allotment Allocation

Postby 2ndRateMind » July 28th, 2012, 5:37 pm

Well, things are proceeding, slowly, but surely, according to plan.

I've cleared the ground of waist high weeds, marked out where everything is going to go, and dug my first 1.2m x 6m bed. Next week, if the weather stays kind, I'll do a bit more digging and plant some fennel.

But oh! my back muscles know they have been working!

Cheers, 2RM.
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