Indian Curries

Cooking it, growing it, eating it. Tell us your favourite recipes and tips, or ask for ideas.
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Cooking it, growing it, eating it. Tell us your favourite recipes and tips, or ask for ideas.

Re: Indian Curries

Postby Sprocket » February 23rd, 2013, 9:14 am

Bev mentions hot curries releasing endorphins above, and I have indeed read more than once that that is a large part of why many people love them, other than sheer masochism. With young blokes, who are a large proportion of hot curry lovers, there's also the macho element: it's common for them to dare each other, sometimes with money riding on it, to eat a restaurant's hottest offering without any drink to cool their mouth down in between mouthfuls.
Re. Phall curry, click here. It says that the word can be spelled in various ways, but doesn't mention 'Dhal' as a way. I was probably confusing it with the Indian word for lentil, as Bev mentioned above. It turns out that it too is an Anglo-Indian dish, invented here and using 'Scotch Bonnet' chillies, which are not really authentic ingredients of real Indian curries. I've used Scotch Bonnets before in other dishes, and they are certainly pretty fiery.
"I'm fucking busy, and vice versa" - Dorothy Parker.
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Re: Indian Curries

Postby GregB » February 23rd, 2013, 9:28 am

Yes, I take the point about endomorphins (though that wouldn't attract me; whisky is much less traumatic :D ), but I was really interested (see my previous post, bottom of page 1) in why the ingredients of a curry matter when you can't taste them anyway.
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Re: Indian Curries

Postby Sprocket » February 23rd, 2013, 9:38 am

Well, you can taste them in a mild curry, such as a Korma.
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Re: Indian Curries

Postby flying finn » February 23rd, 2013, 9:56 am

You can taste them in the hotter ones too. There's also the aroma. Smell and taste are linked.
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Re: Indian Curries

Postby GregB » February 23rd, 2013, 10:13 am

Can you really, though? Are you sure it isn't more a question of texture (eg. chicken is different from veal which is different from fish, etc.) which your brain 'translates' as flavour? Admittedly, as Steve says, a very mild curry might allow the taste to come through, but surely a real scorcher suppresses all other flavours within. As for the smell, I dare say that can emerge regardless of the quantity of curry added, but I suspect the smell 'fools' the diner into believing it is also the flavour they can taste as they eat; as you say, smell and taste are linked.

Incidentally, here's a bad joke I've just made up, inspired by this thread:
A - "What's 'scurrilous'?"
B - "An Indian restaurant without its staple spice."
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Re: Indian Curries

Postby Bev » February 23rd, 2013, 2:48 pm

I agree with Greg that too much heat takes away the ability to really savor the other spices. With the milder, yogurt-based, chicken and potato curry I made last night, the flavors were delicious. I still added red chili powder, just a quarter of the amount I did with the first dish.

Also, it seems most of the recipes follow a basic pattern, which makes me think one can curry just about anything.

PS, Greg, the prawn/pasta dish looks absolutely delicious!
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Re: Indian Curries

Postby GregB » February 23rd, 2013, 3:16 pm

(...) which makes me think one can curry just about anything

Perhaps - you can certainly curry favour but - and here's the 64,000 dollar question - can you curry flavour? :lol:
PS, Greg, the prawn/pasta dish looks absolutely delicious!

Indeed, Bev - but let me pin you down to a question raised by that same post. Would you agree that it's easier to eat Chinese noodles (spaghetti by any other name, as I'm sure Marco Polo would agree :mrgreen: ) with a fork and a spoon than a couple of sticks
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Re: Indian Curries

Postby flying finn » February 23rd, 2013, 3:31 pm

I use cayenne pepper or chilli flakes for a lot of thing. I put cayenne pepper in my tomato sauce for pizza or "spag bol" and I put chilli flakes on my noodles.
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Re: Indian Curries

Postby Bev » February 24th, 2013, 11:13 pm

GregB wrote:
(...) which makes me think one can curry just about anything

Perhaps - you can certainly curry favour but - and here's the 64,000 dollar question - can you curry flavour? :lol:


Hopefully! ;)

Indeed, Bev - but let me pin you down to a question raised by that same post. Would you agree that it's easier to eat Chinese noodles (spaghetti by any other name, as I'm sure Marco Polo would agree :mrgreen: ) with a fork and a spoon than a couple of sticks


Yes, I have to agree. It's still fun to try the chopsticks out, and here--just inside our house--we prefer to use them when eating Pho. But, I also bought the ceramic spoons we use as a helper (in a Chinese kind of way.) Hey, it's all in good fun. ;)
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Re: Indian Curries

Postby Bev » February 28th, 2013, 3:58 pm

I'm excited today as a new cooking pan I've ordered online is on its way (according to the ship tracking info.)

I've been looking for a good-sized pan that is more rounded to make the curries in, and this one looks like it will work well. Most of the youtube curries are cooked in non-stick pans, which I've not used in years (believing them to be unhealthy with too much use.) But, I noticed some cooks using stainless steel or aluminum but they are more rounded, making it easier to continuously stir without scorching.

On the Phall, Sprocket, it seems they use a much hotter (the hottest?) pepper instead of varying portions of Kashmiri red chili powder (or chillies.) I'm learning that most curries use the same basic combination of spices, and just about anything as food ingredients, but merely add chillies (or chili powder) to make them hot.

The youngest son has asked me to make the next curry hot like the first one. Seems he enjoyed eating it much more than I did. Must be those endorphins. :lol:
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