Indian Curries

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Cooking it, growing it, eating it. Tell us your favourite recipes and tips, or ask for ideas.

Re: Indian Curries

Postby flying finn » February 22nd, 2013, 7:58 pm

Palaeologus wrote:I also love getting a cardamon pod by accident, and it going off in my mouth with the rice.


I like that with peppercorns. I call them little peppery surprises.
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Re: Indian Curries

Postby GregB » February 22nd, 2013, 8:31 pm

Well, forgive me for being some kind of eccentric (or even pervert) but I actually like to taste, indeed savour, the various ingredients of my cooked dishes rather than have some fireball erupt in my mouth with each forkful* which reduces such pleasures to what the remains of the charred peripheries of my tastebuds can feebly manage. I have no objection to culinary masochists just as long as they don't expect me to share their predilection for digestive auto da fe, though it always amuses me to hear adepts, often only a generation away from fish and chips in newspaper, babbling on in quasi-esoteric terms about their favourite kinds - degrees of tongue immolation included - of this crap, which I've always understood to have originated in the need to disguise the disgusting flavour of rotted meat and vegetables in the over-populated Indian sub-continent and other such spicelands. In the immortal words of the great Harry S.Truman, undoubtedly an aficionado of a well-cooked steak, include me out.

[* At least this stuff can be acceptably eaten with a fork. One of my pet hates is those pretentious bastards who eat Chinese food from their takeaways or in Chinese restaurants with chopsticks, demonstrating to the world how smugly and knowingly smart and cosmopolitan they are, as well as showing off how they have mastered the art of eating with a couple of bits of wood stuck between their fingers. The fact is, though, that chopsticks are a ridiculously primitive way to eat food, only one step up from using your fingers directly. You cannot cut anything with them, so the food has to be reduced to manageable chunks and gobbets before reaching your table. The knife and fork are infinitely superior in their versatility; indeed, even a spoon alone affords the possibility of cutting food before lifting it to the mouth. The Chinese might have invented gunpowder and paper but they knew sweet FA about how to eat... :twisted: ] "Omigod, that GregB - he's so...so...outré!" :shock:
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Re: Indian Curries

Postby Bev » February 22nd, 2013, 8:55 pm

:D

I actually recently purchased a set of five pairs of chopsticks made from bamboo, as at least the kids and I have enjoyed eating with them. It's great fun and a way to experience not only food differently but to feel you're somewhat in the culture as well.

On the so-hot-you-can't-taste-the-flavors, right now I agree with you. But, I suspect the draw has less to do with taste than with what the brain is doing thinking you've caught your mouth on fire. It releases endorphins. I've heard people talk about enjoying the high in a similar way runners will on long, arduous runs.

Sprocket, "dal" seems to refer to yellow lentils. So, the dish probably has chicken, yellow lentils, and a boat load of red chili pepper.
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Re: Indian Curries

Postby flying finn » February 22nd, 2013, 9:39 pm

I don't agree with the chopstick thing. Sushi, for instance, must be eaten with chopsticks and I love food you can eat with your hands, such a pizza (sorry, but you can't eat pizza with a knife and fork).
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Re: Indian Curries

Postby GregB » February 22nd, 2013, 9:55 pm

Why must sushi (which I detest anyway) be eaten with chopsticks? Why wouldn't a fork suffice? (Ah, it's not culturally correct, right? Well, fuck cultural considerations!) I repeat, chopsticks are greatly inferior to our Western cutlery. As for food you can eat with your hands, obviously some things should be eaten that way - after all, you don't eat a sandwich with a bloody knife and fork, do you...?
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Re: Indian Curries

Postby Bev » February 22nd, 2013, 10:13 pm

GregB wrote:- after all, you don't eat a sandwich with a bloody knife and fork, do you...?


Actually, Bob did just that last night. :D I couldn't convince him to try the Indian dish, so I made him a meatball sub (from the other night's meatballs in red sauce.) He said it was just messy enough he preferred eating it with a knife and fork.

On the chopsticks, I disagree to some extent on their inferior functionality. They're much better than the fork (unless you use a spoon to twirl the noodles into a ball) when eating chinese noodles. I find even with salad, I can pinch just the right amount between chopsticks, whereas the fork doesn't always grab the right combination or amount. We did figure out once though, that chopsticks are likely the reason for sticky rice. :grin:

If the sushi is small enough to fit in your mouth in one bite, then the chopsticks are fine. But, when it's too big for that, which is often the case, then I use a knife and fork.
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Re: Indian Curries

Postby flying finn » February 22nd, 2013, 10:33 pm

GregB wrote:Why must sushi (which I detest anyway) be eaten with chopsticks? Why wouldn't a fork suffice? (Ah, it's not culturally correct, right? Well, fuck cultural considerations!) I repeat, chopsticks are greatly inferior to our Western cutlery. As for food you can eat with your hands, obviously some things should be eaten that way - after all, you don't eat a sandwich with a bloody knife and fork, do you...?



There's a right way and a wrong way to do things. The right way the eat sushi, which I could live on by-the-way, is with chopsticks. Eating it with a knife and fork looks silly. That's what I reckon, anyway.
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Re: Indian Curries

Postby GregB » February 22nd, 2013, 10:52 pm

Bev wrote:
On the chopsticks, I disagree to some extent on their inferior functionality. They're much better than the fork (unless you use a spoon to twirl the noodles into a ball) when eating chinese noodles. I find even with salad, I can pinch just the right amount between chopsticks, whereas the fork doesn't always grab the right combination or amount. We did figure out once though, that chopsticks are likely the reason for sticky rice.

Those are special cases - and I'm not convinced, anyway; twirling apart, you can quite easily eat noodles with a spoon, which scoops them up neatly and in greater quantities than with a couple of sticks, and the different components of a salad can easily be picked up on the tines of a fork, using a knife to gather them first and keep them in place for the fork. And, besides, how do you eat lettuce or large tomatoes with chopsticks unless they've been cut in small pieces first?

Again on sushi, as I said to FF, I have no problem with utensils as I can't stand the stuff anyway. :mrgreen:
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Re: Indian Curries

Postby Bev » February 22nd, 2013, 11:36 pm

I don't know how you eat noodles with a spoon! :shock: I need a video. :mrgreen:

Tonight, Bob wanted another meatball sub, soooooooo :mrgreen: :mrgreen: I tried my hand at a basic chicken curry in yogurt sauce. I cut way back on the red chili powder. I need time to recover anyway. It was delicious! I wish I could convince this man of mine to live dangerously and give it a try. (Bobby is the big fan, who will eat up all the leftovers, even inviting friends if there are too much.)

The sauce, btw, is a yogurt sauce, so this one is creamy. yay
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Re: Indian Curries

Postby GregB » February 23rd, 2013, 8:16 am

I don't know how you eat noodles with a spoon! I need a video.

I see there's been some confusion on my part here. When I'm thinking of noodles, it's the short variety which are called 'fideos' here and which are usually used as basis for seafood dishes, like this:
http://blocs.gracianet.cat/festa_major_ ... 09-_-2.jpg
They are cooked in fish stock with prawns, shrimps and often chunks of calamar and fish added and are delicious. They can be eaten with a spoon, or a knife and fork, depending on how much liquid remains.

Of course, I realise now that Chinese noodles are the long ones, like spaghetti. However, surely - like spaghetti - the easiest way to eat them is with a fork and a spoon (against which one does the twirling.) I know pasta purists (snobs! :twisted: ) prefer to use only a fork, twirling the strands against the plate itself, but I think that is still easier than trying to twirl with chopsticks. Or else, as in the picture below, just lift a quantity of noodles with the two sticks, incline your head backwards with your mouth gaping open like fledgelings in a nest, raise the noodles above your face and drop them into your mouth (not a pretty sight for those opposite you, I'd say :o ) So, just as with a good plate of spaghetti bolognese, it's a fork and a spoon for me. :grin:
http://freepresskashmir.com/wp-content/ ... oodles.jpg

Getting back to curries, given that the dominant flavour is the spice itself and the dominant effect the searing of your mouth and throat, does it really matter what the ingredients are as you can't taste them anyway (chicken curry, veal curry, fish curry - all the same in the end)?
"The wiles of dissembling fate afford us the illusion of freedom, yet in the end always lead us into the same trap."
- Jean Cocteau
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