Sauerkraut

Cooking it, growing it, eating it. Tell us your favourite recipes and tips, or ask for ideas.
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Cooking it, growing it, eating it. Tell us your favourite recipes and tips, or ask for ideas.

Re: Sauerkraut

Postby GregB » August 1st, 2013, 6:52 pm

On 'sauté', DG said:
Quote:
[...]"saute" I have always understood as meaning "to fry over a mild heat, with a gentle jiggling motion of the pan, so that the things being fried 'jump' about a bit"

Actually, that does convey the literal meaning of the French term sauté - 'to jump' or 'to leap'. The idea is to gently toss (or jiggle, as DG describes it) the food in the frying pan with a little oil so each portion gets a light fried coating. Evidently it derives from the Latin 'saltire', with the same meaning, as is evident in the equivalent Spanish word, 'saltear'. Any dish which receives the tossing treatment is described as 'salteado' (eg. peas - 'guisantes' - cooked and then tossed with chunks of ham in a frying pan: 'guisantes salteados'.) Bev talks about stirring the food but really you have to toss it with a firm grip on the handle of the pan to live up to the description, as the wokmeisters do.

Steve said earlier:
"One example, possibly apocryphal, I heard of extreme pretentiousness was a restaurant whose menu included "pommes de terre frite a l'anglais", which turned out to mean chips! (or fries, as our American chums call them)."
Delightful! :D Actually, though, Americans call them, if I'm not mistaken, French fries, though the phrase in Steve's post clearly indicates that the French recognise that chips are, like most things ( :mrgreen: ), a British invention. This is solid evidence as getting the French to admit that something is of English origin is like getting blood out of a stone* - they really do have a French fry on the shoulder about this...:blink:

[* Or, in the case of Mick Jagger, money out of a stone...]
"We have more knowledge than those who came before us not because of our greater intelligence and understanding, but because we are dwarves sitting on the shoulders of giants who preceded us."
- Bernard of Chartres
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Re: Sauerkraut

Postby Sprocket » August 5th, 2013, 5:28 pm

My fermentation pot arrived on Saturday in a HUGE box, inside which was lots of shredded cardboard, inside which was a smaller box, inside which was more shredded cardboard, inside which was the pot, with yet more shredded cardboard between the lid and the pot. Full marks to Schmitt, the German makers, for taking precautions agains breakage. It was, obviously, earthenware after all, not plastic, as it appeared to be on the Amazon page, about which I was quite glad, because I dislike plastic. Also on Saturday arrived a book I'd ordered from Amazon, called 'Real Food Fermentaition: preserving whole fresh food with live cultures in your home kitchen', by Alex Lewin. It includes a photo of suitable vessels for making sauerkraut and other fermented preserves in, including one identical to mine, which he calls a Harsch crock, and which Wikipedia confirms is another name for it, as is Gartopf crock. However, in the text he's a bit ho-hum about them, preferring smaller vessels.
The fermenting crock came with a leaflet headed "Rezepte fur original-biologische gartopfe", fortunately for me with an English translation on the inside. They are for various flavoured krauts, plus other things, such as sour beans and red beets. I'll try some of them, as well as Mr Lewin's recipes, eventually, but for now I've started a plain sauerkraut with home-grown kale and cabbage, which filled it up to the top, even when pressed down. It's now starting to produce its own brine by the osmotic action of the added sea-salt.
Treason doth never prosper: what's the reason?
Why, if it prosper, none dare call it treason.
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Re: Sauerkraut

Postby Bev » August 6th, 2013, 3:21 pm

:good:

I'll be watching for updates, especially on how long it takes. (Adding the kale sounds so delicious.)

Greg, thanks for the lesson on sauté. On cooking shows, you do see the chef flip the pan's contents by the method you described. I've never tried it fearing the whole lot will end up on the stove burner. :oops:
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Re: Sauerkraut

Postby Sprocket » October 27th, 2013, 2:01 pm

I've just (yesterday) started another sauerkraut, with two savoy cabbages (the wrinkled-leaved ones), plus red onions and green and red chillies, chopped up small. I used red onions to add a bit of colour - I wanted to use red cabbage as well, but Asda (the British branch of the Walmart empire) didn't have any. I've just had a feel inside the crock, and it's already starting to feel wet, so the salt is doing its job. I'll let you know what onion-and-chilli-flavoured sauerkraut tastes like in the fullness of time.
Treason doth never prosper: what's the reason?
Why, if it prosper, none dare call it treason.
Sir John Harington (1561-1620)
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Re: Sauerkraut

Postby Sprocket » November 9th, 2013, 4:57 pm

The one mentioned above is now jarred and being eaten, and I have today started another one: two large red cabbages, a red onion, grated root ginger, two grated turnips, chopped chillis, and crushed garlic, total weight 6lbs, so I added 5 oz sea salt and mixed thoroughly. Should be interesting. The one I'm now eating is excellent - you can taste the onions, but not really the chilli.
Treason doth never prosper: what's the reason?
Why, if it prosper, none dare call it treason.
Sir John Harington (1561-1620)
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Re: Sauerkraut

Postby Sprocket » November 10th, 2013, 1:32 pm

Judging by the smell, the one I started yesterday is already fermenting well. The first sk I did in the crock took about a week before it was obviously fermenting, and four weeks or so to be ready, but the second, which is now being consumed, started very quickly, and only took a fortnight to be ready, and this one too has got off to a rapid start. The crock itself is glazed inside and out, but the two weights which go on top of the ingredients are unglazed, and my guess is that they absorb some of the friendly bacteria which cause the fermentation, so that subsequent fermentations get off to a quick start. I don't know whether this is deliberate, but it's certainly welcome. I wash the weights and the crock well before re-using, but no doubt some bacteria survive.
Treason doth never prosper: what's the reason?
Why, if it prosper, none dare call it treason.
Sir John Harington (1561-1620)
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Re: Sauerkraut

Postby Bev » November 11th, 2013, 12:56 am

If this were on Facebook, I would so "like" it. :D
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Re: Sauerkraut

Postby GregB » November 11th, 2013, 8:18 am

Bev wrote:If this were on Facebook, I would so "like" it. :D

:scratch: Bit puzzled - why would Facebook enhance the attractions or appeal of sauerkraut? (I ask as a non-Facebook user who has no idea how it functions.)
"We have more knowledge than those who came before us not because of our greater intelligence and understanding, but because we are dwarves sitting on the shoulders of giants who preceded us."
- Bernard of Chartres
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Re: Sauerkraut

Postby Sprocket » November 11th, 2013, 1:03 pm

Bev means she'd hit the "like" button on it.
Treason doth never prosper: what's the reason?
Why, if it prosper, none dare call it treason.
Sir John Harington (1561-1620)
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Sprocket
 
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Re: Sauerkraut

Postby GregB » November 11th, 2013, 2:08 pm

Oh, I see. Just out of interest, what happens if someone doesn't get enough "like" hits? Are they fed to the Internet Olympic Piranha Team*? :mrgreen:

[* Gold medallists for reducing an unwary Internet surfer to a skeleton worthy of the best anatomical laboratories in 20 seconds flat. :shock:]
"We have more knowledge than those who came before us not because of our greater intelligence and understanding, but because we are dwarves sitting on the shoulders of giants who preceded us."
- Bernard of Chartres
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