Sauerkraut

Cooking it, growing it, eating it. Tell us your favourite recipes and tips, or ask for ideas.
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Cooking it, growing it, eating it. Tell us your favourite recipes and tips, or ask for ideas.

Re: Sauerkraut

Postby Sprocket » November 13th, 2013, 9:26 am

GregB wrote:A conversation between Goldwyn and George W. Bush might have been one of the greatest comedy double-acts of all time.

And if 'Yogi' Berra was there as well, it'd be even better! Some famous 'Yogi-isms':

As a general comment on baseball: "90% of the game is half mental."[2]
On why he no longer went to Ruggeri's, a St. Louis restaurant: "Nobody goes there anymore. It's too crowded."[2]
"It ain't over 'til it's over." In July 1973, Berra's Mets trailed the Chicago Cubs by 9½ games in the National League East. The Mets rallied to win the division title on the final day of the season.[2]
When giving directions to Joe Garagiola to his New Jersey home, which is accessible by two routes: "When you come to a fork in the road, take it."[2]
On being the guest of honor at an awards banquet: "Thank you for making this day necessary."[2]
"It's déjà vu all over again". Berra explained that this quote originated when he witnessed Mickey Mantle and Roger Maris repeatedly hit back-to-back home runs in the Yankees' seasons in the early 1960s.[2]
"You can observe a lot by watching."[2]
"Always go to other people's funerals, otherwise they won't go to yours."[2]
Treason doth never prosper: what's the reason?
Why, if it prosper, none dare call it treason.
Sir John Harington (1561-1620)
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Re: Sauerkraut

Postby Sprocket » November 16th, 2013, 2:19 pm

GregB wrote:I find it sadly irrelevant if there are some intelligent opinions expressed on it. They used to be expressed and well guarded in the treasure-filled caves of Western culture without the overwhelming presence of the Morlocks* who have now been given their moment with the opening of the Pandora's Box of the social networks, the great egalitarian con trick which elevates any stupid prick with a PC to the level of an oracle or muse in even less time than Andy Warhol's predicted 15 minutes' of fame for everyone. Cavafy's 'Barbarians At The Gates' are already inside.

Pardon my despair...

[* cf. H.G.Wells dystopic 'The Time Machine'.]

Fair point, but one might say the same about on-line forums such as this - and, heaven knows, we've had some severely intellectually-challenged* members in the past.

*Yes, I agree - "challenged", in this kind of usage, is one of the silliest modern euphemisms: I'm using it ironically.
Treason doth never prosper: what's the reason?
Why, if it prosper, none dare call it treason.
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Re: Sauerkraut

Postby Sprocket » November 16th, 2013, 2:24 pm

Sprocket wrote:Judging by the smell, the one I started yesterday is already fermenting well.

That was posted on the 10th inst, which means the present one was started on the 9th, a week ago. It smells and looks as though it's ready, but one week is rather quick - I think I'll give it a bit longer, maybe until the stuff I'm consuming now is finished, before bottling.
Treason doth never prosper: what's the reason?
Why, if it prosper, none dare call it treason.
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Re: Sauerkraut

Postby Bev » November 20th, 2013, 2:30 pm

Your sauerkraut came to mind, Sprocket, after researching scientific findings on the benefits of fermented vegetables and health. I wondered if you've noticed any difference in your health (even your mood) since you began regularly consuming your own fermented vegetables.

I'm going to try making my own, but I'm going to use glass jars. Your thread here will be very helpful, so thanks! :D
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Re: Sauerkraut

Postby Bev » November 20th, 2013, 8:11 pm

Started my own today. I finely grated garlic, green cabbage, one apple (not so finely shopped), onion, celeriac root, and parsley root (I'm making a chicken soup for my granddaughter too. She's sick and fell asleep on my sofa after I picked her up early from school, so I used some of the root veggies I got for the soup and added it to my kraut.) I added coriander seed, mustard seed, half-tsp of dried chili, and an eight tsp of cumin seed. I'm regretting the cumin seed, as it's overpowering the flavor right now.)

I might have used too much salt, about three tablespoons for one large head of cabbage. It tastes too salty right now. But, there's enough natural liquid already to submerge the cabbage, and it's only been about two hours. I'm using a large glass bowl, with a plate and a bowl to weigh the cabbage down.

At what point should I transfer it into glass jars and refrigerate? And after, does it still ferment? (It's warm and humid here, but the a/c keeps the room temp about 78. Is that too warm?)

I'm also a little worried about the scum. :? Does some of it end up in the kraut when you skim and put the plate back in?
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Re: Sauerkraut

Postby Sprocket » November 20th, 2013, 10:20 pm

I think you remove any scum, but I don't think it's essential. The amount of salt you mention does sound like rather a lot. My books all say 4 ozs of salt (sea or koshering, not table, because that has extra ingredients) to every 5 lbs of the other ingredients. Depends how much a tablespoon of salt weighs, and that'd vary according to how coarse it is. As for when to bottle - when it's stopped fermenting, but when that is is hard to determine, because the type of fermentation involved is different from yeast fermentation, and is much less dramatic. Give it 2-3 weeks, and you probably won't be far out. Anyway, it probably doesn't matter if it hasn't quite finished.
Treason doth never prosper: what's the reason?
Why, if it prosper, none dare call it treason.
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Re: Sauerkraut

Postby Bev » November 20th, 2013, 11:28 pm

Thanks, Sprocket. I'll see how it goes. By tonight, the slaw is fully submerged, which is good. No sign of any activity yet, but it's all covered and waiting on my counter top.
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Re: Sauerkraut

Postby Sprocket » January 7th, 2014, 10:02 am

My latest batch is fermenting well in the crock. It is a mixture of green cabbage and cauliflower, the latter broken up into florets as small as I could make them. It took some time to get going, but is going well now, judging by the smell - when I stick my nose right into the crock, I don't so much smell it as feel it - a sharp stinging sensation at the back of the nose. I've nearly finished the previous lot, so I'll put it into jars soon (it continues fermenting in the jars, of course, unless fermentation has finished naturally, but more slowly, because the jars go in the fridge).
Treason doth never prosper: what's the reason?
Why, if it prosper, none dare call it treason.
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Re: Sauerkraut

Postby Bev » January 7th, 2014, 4:45 pm

I'll have to check mine. The two jars I made before Thanksgiving have been in the pantry, and I nearly forgot about them! I'm feeling ever so unsure about whether or not I did it right and whether or not it will be any good. :)
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Re: Sauerkraut

Postby Sprocket » January 27th, 2014, 10:16 pm

The cabbage-and cauli one is now being consumed. Not bad, but not great - a bit on the salty side. Yesterday (Sunday), I started a new one, which will be deep purple - 'red' cabbage, actually a particularly dark purple, red onions (ditto), beetroot, and red 'Scotch Bonnet' chillies. Not sure how well the flavours of beetroot and chilli will combine, but no harm in experimenting. I used the amount of salt recommended by Alex thingy in his book about fermeted food, 2% of the weight of the combined other ingredients, which is only about half as much as the recipes in my other two books recommend, but it certainly seems to have drawn the liquid out of the veg. well. I chopped everything up roughly, then bunged it all through the food processor, which chopped it all down good and small. I haven't used the F.P. before, because I was afraid it'd reduce everything to a semi-liquid mush, which I didn't want, but it doesn't with those ingredients, perhaps because they're relatively dry. Being chopped up much smaller than I could manage by hand may result in a more complete fermentation, because the bugs will have more surface area to work on. Anyway, we shall see.
Alexy thingy has a recipe in his book which I might try next for fermented Carolina-style "slaw" (i.e. coleslaw). apparently, Carolina coleslaw is made with a vinegar-based dressing, and he reckons, on what evidence I know not, that originally it would have been fermented, and the vinegar dressing was introduced as a way of getting something similar more quickly. Well, whatever the historical facts, it sounds delicious, so I'll try it.
Treason doth never prosper: what's the reason?
Why, if it prosper, none dare call it treason.
Sir John Harington (1561-1620)
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Sprocket
 
Posts: 15959
Joined: October 25th, 2007, 11:21 am
Location: Hemel Hempstead, Herts.

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