Raw milk

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Cooking it, growing it, eating it. Tell us your favourite recipes and tips, or ask for ideas.

Raw milk

Postby sally » February 10th, 2016, 9:21 am

Just discovered that a farm near us has started selling unpasteurised milk. Has anyone tried cheese making?

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Re: Raw milk

Postby GregB » February 15th, 2016, 6:14 pm

Well, the dearth of replies suggests that nobody has. Speaking for myself, someone who has laziness down to a fine art (or would have if I could be bothered), I've never been one to go through the (laborious for me) process of making food products (including bread) which can easily be purchased in the growing number of food stores these days which deal in natural foods. Bakeries here now increasingly have a wide range of different breads, which makes baking your own rather pointless.

Returning to cheese, goat's cheese has become very popular here, especially in the form of a kind of thick baton of the stuff encased in a crackly thickish rind, which contrasts nicely with the creamy stuff in the middle. Slices, or discs, of this served atop salads are the culinary vogue now.
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Re: Raw milk

Postby Sprocket » February 15th, 2016, 10:47 pm

Making your own bread is good for the soul. It's also fun.
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Re: Raw milk

Postby Sprocket » February 15th, 2016, 10:49 pm

To answer the O.P., though - no, though I've made yoghurt a few times. It tastes fine, but is always sloppier than the bought product. I've never tried raw milk, and can't see the advantage - I don't think pasteurisation does anything drastic to the taste.
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Re: Raw milk

Postby Serenjen » February 15th, 2016, 11:25 pm

I've only made paneer which isn't like cheese as we know it. Also, massive faff.
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Re: Raw milk

Postby GregB » February 16th, 2016, 8:15 am

Sprocket wrote:Making your own bread is good for the soul. It's also fun.

Perhaps so - but only if you really knead it...

I've never attempted to make yoghourt, though I am good at making alioii (or aioli), a kind of garlic mayonnaise popular in the Mediterranean area, especially around south-west France and here in Catalonia. You have to pound garlic cloves to a pulp in a mortar using a pestle. You then drip in olive oil as you stir with the pestle until you have the quantity you want. A popular version here has you adding the yolk of an egg, which emulsifies it and gives it the character of mayonnaise. The consistency must be so thick that you can leave the pestle stuck upright in its midst without its tipping over. It's a tasty sauce with meat (especially lamb.)

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-w9gDcQazlpM/U ... om-010.jpg

If it's really strong in garlic, it should have this kind of effect:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FizCq29sEq0
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Re: Raw milk

Postby sally » February 16th, 2016, 8:30 am

It's not so much the taste as the effect on the milk proteins. It is allegedly much harder to get the curd to form with pasteurised milk - my first attempt with raw milk was disastrous, more like a lump of rubber than cheese :) Texture was so bleurgh, we didn't get as far as trying to assess the flavour!

Yoghurt thickness seems to depend on the milk used. The thickest we have managed was with homogenised jersey milk -tastes good too. The raw milk version tasted great, but was very sloppy. I'll try heating for longer next time and see what effect that has.

And you can't get good bread round here, supermarket standard is ok, but if you want nice bread, you need to knead.

I'm going to try your alioii, Greg - sounds good, and a lot less faff than cheese!

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Re: Raw milk

Postby Sprocket » February 16th, 2016, 8:48 am

I suppose the consistency of yoghurt depends mainly on the consistency of the milk used. It's years since I've made any, so I can't remember, but I probably used semi-skimmed, which is what I use for other purposes. Maybe I'll try again soon, with whole milk. I believe Jersey milk is richest of the lot, so it's not surprising that it produced the best results for Sally.
That garlic sauce sounds great - I might try it. I've got a brass mortar and pestle. I'm a garlic fiend, and currently have some garlic pickle, from the local Asian supermarket, open.
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Re: Raw milk

Postby Sprocket » February 16th, 2016, 8:53 am

I've just bookmarked this alioli recipe. It sounds bloody fattening, though: 25% of an adult's recommended daily calorie intake in one serving - and Jamie recommends dunking chips in it! I thought he was the healthy-eating evangelist!
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Re: Raw milk

Postby GregB » February 16th, 2016, 9:27 am

It shouldn't be all that fattening. With the simple recipe I follow (see my post further up) rather than the fancy frills and extras you expect from TV chefs to tart dishes up, it's only the olive oil which has calories in significant numbers, and even then a quantity of alioli prepared for just one or two people shouldn't contain all that many - and, in any case, you normally only put a good dollop on your plate, not the entire mortar's worth. Also bear in mind that olive oil (especially the virgin variety) is actually good for you, especially for the heart, while the one-time conventional medical wisdom about eggs and bad cholesterol has now been overturned*. And garlic is also beneficial to the health (as well as keeping vampires at bay - not to mention your friends when they smell your breath.)

So, bring on the alioli! And, by the way, it's also good with a local dish here, fideua - noodles with seafood, basically prawns and calamar (ie. squid): http://www.gifanimados.com/blog/DSC_3r781.JPG

[* It reminds me of 'Nineteen Eighty-Four' - yesterday's enemies are now our friends, and vice versa.]
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