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Re: Just popped by!

Postby GregB » May 27th, 2014, 7:04 am

Sprocket wrote:I think it is acknowledged that puberty kicks in a few years earlier now than it did decades ago. I don't know about hormones in food; could be, but I think it's probably that we're all better-fed and generally healthier than we used to be.
Hi, Sarnie, btw?

Yes, the change of voice in boys is associated with puberty and it may well have advanced in terms of age in recent times. Mind you, I recall my own voice change and those of my contemporaries at school when I was only around twelve/thirteen years old and that was back in 1959/60, so perhaps there are other factors involved (though the only hormones I was exposed to back then were those I heard whenever I passed a brothel... :mrgreen: )
"The wiles of dissembling fate afford us the illusion of freedom, yet in the end always lead us into the same trap."
- Jean Cocteau
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Re: Just popped by!

Postby Sprocket » May 27th, 2014, 7:10 am

:D
I remember, at about that age, pretending to leer at photos of scantily-clad women shown me by friends, though I hadn't quite reached puberty yet, and didn't really feel any stirrings in my loins. Mind you, maybe my friends were faking as well!
Treason doth never prosper: what's the reason?
Why, if it prosper, none dare call it treason.
Sir John Harington (1561-1620)
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Re: Just popped by!

Postby sarniajoy » May 27th, 2014, 7:37 am

Bev wrote:Done! So sorry about that. :oops:

Sarniajoy wrote:
The grandchildren are growing up fast and doing well, the youngest, our only granddaughter is now six going on twenty six! :mrgreen:


Aren't they all? I don't know about there, but here we think it's all the hormones in the food. Our eleven-year-old grandson's voice dropped when he had just turned 11. Having all boys myself, that seems awfully young. If I remember right, the youngest the boys' voices changed was about sixteen.


Thanks :grin:

Our eldest grandson is 12, he has high grade autism, highly intelligent, but finds social interaction difficult. His Mum is home schooling him and his younger brother (9) who has atypical dyslexia. They are doing brilliantly. Both lads can cook a three course meal, no problem! :grin: Still I don't envy our two married daughters having to put up with teenage hormones when their kids get to that stage. :mrgreen:
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Re: Just popped by!

Postby Bev » May 28th, 2014, 12:54 am

Sprocket wrote::D
I remember, at about that age, pretending to leer at photos of scantily-clad women shown me by friends, though I hadn't quite reached puberty yet, and didn't really feel any stirrings in my loins. Mind you, maybe my friends were faking as well!


:D

This reminded me of my oldest son, the day I was taking him for his 9-year checkup. I was a single parent by then and had been for a couple of years. In the middle of heavy traffic, he began describing how a boy in the neighborhood had earlier showed them a deck of cards that had pictures of naked women on them. As the traffic intensified, he said, "I do understand why they wanted to look at them." He then began to describe the physical sensation he would experience when looking at them. I remember looking desperately between him and the traffic to see just what place he was pointing to on his own body when he was so innocently trying to describe the tingling feeling he would get when he looked at the cards. :?

Later, when I talked to his pediatrician about it, he gave me two small booklets and suggested I place them innocently among the other books in the library. He assured me the boys would find them at the right time without me being involved. Later that night, I looked through both of them. I was so embarrassed when my oldest came into the room unexpectedly when I was in the middle of the "What to tell your children ages ten through twelve." I felt as if he'd caught me viewing pornography.

Those were difficult times for me, I remember. :oops: But, we did all survive it well enough. :)
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Re: Just popped by!

Postby Sweet Peace » May 28th, 2014, 10:10 am

Welcome back Sarnie. I read something yesterday that said autism is not a processing error. It's a different operating system.
Where sin abounded, grace did much more abound.
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Re: Just popped by!

Postby sarniajoy » May 28th, 2014, 10:15 am

My mother was too embarrassed to talk to me about the facts of life! She left it to me, as a teenager and the eldest child, to tell my younger sisters what they needed to know! :o

I was determined that our own children would be told the facts in an age appropriate way as soon as they started asking questions, which they did from about the ages of three or four. No topic was ever taboo, we dealt with everything, our meal times conversations could be X rated! :mrgreen: I did have a rule that if my mother was present talk of sex was off the menu :mrgreen:
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Re: Just popped by!

Postby sarniajoy » May 28th, 2014, 10:21 am

Sweet Peace wrote:Welcome back Sarnie. I read something yesterday that said autism is not a processing error. It's a different operating system.


A lot of people with high grade autism are highly intelligent and very successful, Bill Gates is reputed to be autistic. I think my husband is on autistic spectrum too, although we have only realised that since his illness. He had a Mensa level intelligence four good degrees, and succeeded well in his career. However I can see some of my grandson's quirky behaviour in him, and this has become more pronounced now half his brain is trashed.
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Re: Just popped by!

Postby Bev » May 28th, 2014, 2:11 pm

There was a recent report about a scientist, father to an autistic child, who proposed the autistic brain is quite over active and sensitive to stimulus rather than under active as their behavior might indicate. To support his hypothesis, he used brain imaging to show much greater electrical activity in response to even the mildest (primarily audio) stimulation.

This made sense to me. I have one son (not the one previously mentioned) who was diagnosed mildly autistic with high IQ when he was five. He acted as if he did not see or hear others around him (except for immediate family). Going anywhere public was quite a challenge. He would cry the whole time, often even at the grocery store. When he got older, he described how rattling the noise of such places was for him, which made sense.
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Re: Just popped by!

Postby sally » June 4th, 2014, 10:32 am

I have removed the posts about events on another forum.

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Re: Just popped by!

Postby sarniajoy » June 4th, 2014, 10:44 am

Thank you.
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