Sermons

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Re: Sermons

Postby Sweet Peace » February 20th, 2011, 11:29 pm

:good: Thanks.
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Re: Sermons

Postby Theophilus » February 27th, 2011, 10:08 pm

Sermon on the Sunday of the Last Judgment
by Metropolitan Anthony of Sourozh


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This is the Sunday of the Last Judgement. A day will come when all of us will stand before God, each person bringing his own harvest and, as the Book of Revelation tells us, every kingdom, every nation bringing its glory and also its shame.

On that day the time for faith will be over, because faith is certainty about things unseen, and on that day, in the blinding glory of God, we will see; we will see Him as He sees us, we will know Him as He knows us. And the time for hope will be over, because hope is expectation, and on that day all things will have been fulfilled; it will be the eighth day, the last day, the last day of time, the last day of becoming; it will be the first day of eternity.

And on that threshold we shall stand; what are we going to bring? What will be the fruit of a whole life, of each of us singly, of all of us in our togetherness? Not as a crowd of individuals unrelated to each other, but as a living body of people who have all, all been baptised into Christ, into unity, into oneness, who are all called by the power of the Holy Spirit to be the only-begotten son of God in the Only-begotten Son of God - what are we going to bring then? The only thing that can survive, faith and hope being of the past, will be love.

And this is what today's parable speaks about; not so much of the terror, the horror that may seize each of us, freeze the heart within us or, like a fire, burn us at that moment; it speaks of that confrontation when we shall see that the whole meaning of life is love, and ask ourselves: is there any within me? Have I borne any fruits of love? And the parable speaks of that.. It does not say that we shall be acknowledged because we said to ourselves or others that we believe in God, because we described ourselves as disciples of Christ. As He Himself said, on that day He will tell us that those who have not lived up to the Gospel, been His disciples in all truth, will not be recognised by Him. But we may well say, Have we not prayed in Thy churches? Indeed, have we not worked miracles in Thy name? - And He will answer, Go away, workers of iniquity!

But what is then our hope? This parable speaks of it so clearly, in a word that may be summed up as, "If you have been human - then you are of the Kingdom. If you have not been human - you are not". It is not questions of faith which Christ is asking; He is asking whether there was compassion in our hearts, whether we could see suffering around us and respond - or not. And if we have responded, we are His own.

But there is something almost more wonderful in this parable; it is not addressed only to the Christian, to the disciple, to the believer, because when He says to those who have been filled with compassion, filled with love, "You have done all these things: you have fed the hungry, you have given shelter to the homeless, you have visited the sick, you have not been ashamed of recognising as your brother the one who was in prison", and so forth, all those people will say, "But when did we see You in these people?" And Christ will say to us, "What you have done to one of My brethren, you have done to Me".

Isn't it wonderful to think that love bridges all gaps, that love can survive all trials; that being human does not mean seeing in my brother an image of God, seeing in my brother God's beloved for who He gave His life; it is enough for us to see in our neighbour one who needs compassion: a human being, nothing more - and then, we have done the right thing.

Today we remember the judgement, and it is also the beginning of our fast. From today onwards, Orthodox Christians abstain from meat. Has it any meaning apart from the ascetic, the disciplinary? Yes, it has, I think. There is a frightening passage in the ninth chapter of Genesis. After the flood, when mankind has become even weaker than before, less rooted in God, more tragically alone, more tragically dependent upon the created because it has lost communion with the uncreated, God says to Noah and his people, "From now on all living creatures are delivered unto you as food; they will be your meat, and you will be their terror...'' That is the relationship which human sin, the loss of God in our lives, has established between us and all the created world, but particularly, in a particularly painful, monstrous way with the animal world. And our abstention from meat in the time of Lent is our act of recognition; it is also - oh, to such a small extent! - an act of reparation. We are the terror of the created world, we are those who destroy it, we are those who mar and pollute it, yet we are called originally to be its guide into eternity, into God's glory, into the perfect beauty which God has intended for it. We were called to make of this world of ours God's own world, God's own Kingdom - in the sense that it is His family, the place where He lives among His creatures, and where the creatures of God can rejoice in Him and in one another.

Let us therefore, to the extent to which we are faithful to the call of the Church, remember that apart from being an act by which we try to free ourselves from slavery to the material world, our fasting is an act of recognition of our sin against the world and, however small, a real attempt to make reparation for it, bring a testimony that we understand, that we are heartbroken, and that even if we cannot live otherwise, we live with a pain and a shame, and turn to God and to the world, which we treat so atrociously, with a broken and contrite heart.

Amen.
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Re: Sermons

Postby Theophilus » March 6th, 2011, 8:30 pm

Forgiveness Sunday

It is, at last, time for Great Lent to begin. The weeks of preparation are at their end; the gradual reduction and proscription of foods and activities comes now under the full weight of the Fast. The Church, on this very night of the 'Sunday of Forgiveness', has had its fabrics of whites and golds solemnly removed and replaced with deep purple: her customary garments of joy are exchanged for the attire of penitence. And so, kneeling and prostrate, her people look ahead to Pascha, the great feast of the Light, for the first time from within the context of the full Lenten discipline.

    Thy grace has shown forth, O Lord, it has shone forth and given light to our souls. Behold, now is the accepted time; behold, now is the season of repentance. Let us cast off the works of darkness and put on the armour of light, that having sailed across the great sea of the Fast, we may reach the third-day Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Saviour of our souls.


The Sunday of Forgiveness stands, as others have written, at the 'threshold of Great Lent'. The Vespers of this evening is a cardinal moment for many: a service in darkness by which their whole mode and attitude of being are propelled as if by a great wave into the 'sea of the Fast'. There have been, already, four weeks of preparation for this moment; but this Sunday is the actual doorway into Lent, the threshold on the other side of which stands the fullest measure of ascesis that the Church metes out to the whole of her faithful throughout the world.

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Re: Sermons

Postby Sweet Peace » March 23rd, 2011, 11:12 pm

I began listening to this series this morning - Stories that tell the Gospel by Trevor Faggotter. http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.a ... 1241001890
Easier listening than what you might call a sermon. So far it's about revival that broke out in Pakistan in the 1960s and the incredible waves of love as the Holy Spirit spread through the congregation.
Highly recommended. I hope some will give it a try. :good:
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Re: Sermons

Postby Theophilus » April 4th, 2011, 10:30 pm

The Significance of Fasting in the Struggle against Demons
By St. Ignatius (Brianchaninov)


Homily for the Fourth Sunday of Lent

      The Lord said to His Apostles about the evil spirits, “This kind can come forth by nothing, but by prayer and fasting” (Mark. 9:29).


Here is a new aspect of fasting!

Fasting is acceptable to God when it is preceded by the great virtue of mercy; fasting prepares a reward in heaven when it is foreign to hypocrisy and vainglory; fasting works when it is joined with another great virtue – prayer.

How does it work? It not only tames the passions in the human body, but it enters into battle with the spirits of evil, and conquers them...

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Re: Sermons

Postby Theophilus » April 10th, 2011, 10:23 pm

Sermon for the Sunday of St. Mary of Egypt
by Metropolitan Anthony Sourozh

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In the Name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. Amen.

Week after week we feel that we are coming closer and closer to the glorious Resurrection of Christ. And it seems to us that we are moving fast, from Sunday to Sunday as it were, to the day when all horrors, all terrors, will have disappeared.

And yet so easily do we forget that before we reach the day of the Resurrection we must, together with Christ, together with His apostles, tread the road of the Crucifixion. 'So we are ascending to Jerusalem, and the Son of Man will be delivered into the hands of men, and they shall crucify Him, and the third day He will rise’. All we notice is that He will rise. But do we ever think of the way in which the disciples went to Jerusalem, knowing that the Crucifixion was at hand? They were moving in fear. They were not yet mature enough to be those who would give their lives for the message to be spread. They were moving in fear. When Christ told them that they would go now to Jerusalem, return to the city which had then renounced Christ, put Him into danger of His life, they said to Him, 'Let us not go.' And only one disciple, Thomas, said, 'No. Let us go with Him, and die with Him.'

This disciple is the one whom, foolishly I believe, we call the Doubter: the one who was not prepared to give his trust to God, his faith, his life, his blood, without certainty. But his heart was unreservedly given to Christ. How wonderful to be such a man! But the other disciples would not desert Christ. They walked towards Jerusalem.

And we have today another example of one who went through a tragedy before they met Christ. It is Mary of Egypt. She was a sinner. She was a harlot. She was unfaithful to God in her soul and in her body. She had no reverence for this body which God had created and this soul. And yet she was tragically confronted with the fact that there was no way for her into the temple of God unless she rejected evil and chose purity, repentance, newness of life.

Let us reflect on the disciples who almost begged Christ not to return to Jerusalem, because Jerusalem was a city where all prophets had died; and they did not want Christ to die, and they were afraid. Let us ask ourselves how much we resemble them. And let us ask ourselves freely today how do we resemble, or not, Mary of Egypt - Mary who had lived her life according to her own ways and desires, followed all temptations of her body and soul; and one day realised that as she was, she could not enter the temple of God.

So easily do we enter the divine temple, forgetting so easily that the church into which we come is a small part of a world that has chosen to be alien to God, that has rejected God, lost interest in Him; and that the few believers have created for God a place of refuge - yes, the church is the fullness of Heaven, and at the same time a tragic place of refuge, the only place where God has a right to be because He is wanted. And when we come here, we enter into the divine realm. We should come into it with a sense of awe, not just walk into it as into a space but walk into it as a space which is already the divine Kingdom.

If we were in that mood we would, when we come to the doors of the church, be, however little, like Mary of Egypt. We would stop and say, 'How can I come in?' And if we did that with our whole heart, broken-heartedly, with a sense of horror of the fact that we are so distant from God, so alien, so unfaithful to Him, then the doors would open and we would see that we are not simply in a big space surrounded with walls but we are in a space which is God's Heaven come to earth.

Let us therefore learn from this experience what it means to go step by step towards the Resurrection, because in order to reach the Resurrection we must go through Calvary, we must go through the tragedy of Holy Week and make it our own, partaking with Christ and His disciples and the crowds around in the horror, the terror of it; and also experience it as a scorching fire that will burn in us all that is unworthy of God and make us clean. And perhaps one day, when the fire will have burnt everything which is not worthy of God, each of us may become an image of the burning bush, aflame with divine fire and not consumed, because only that which could survive the fire of God would have remained is us. Amen.
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Re: Sermons

Postby Theophilus » April 16th, 2011, 10:40 pm

Excerpt from St Andrew of Crete's homily on Palm Sunday
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Let us go together to meet Christ on the Mount of Olives. Today he returns from Bethany and proceeds of his own free will toward his holy and blessed passion, to consummate the mystery of our salvation. He who came down from heaven to raise us from the depths of sin, to raise us with himself, we are told in Scripture, above every sovereignty, authority and power, and every other name that can be named, now comes of his own free will to make his journey to Jerusalem. He comes without pomp or ostentation. As the psalmist says: He will not dispute or raise his voice to make it heard in the streets. He will be meek and humble, and he will make his entry in simplicity.

Let us run to accompany him as he hastens toward his passion, and imitate those who met him then, not by covering his path with garments, olive branches or palms, but by doing all we can to prostrate ourselves before him by being humble and by trying to live as he would wish. Then we shall be able to receive the Word at his coming, and God, whom no limits can contain, will be within us.

In his humility Christ entered the dark regions of our fallen world and he is glad that he became so humble for our sake, glad that he came and lived among us and shared in our nature in order to raise us up again to himself. And even though we are told that he has now ascended above the highest heavens - the proof, surely, of his power and godhead - his love for man will never rest until he has raised our earthbound nature from glory to glory, and made it one with his own in heaven.

So let us spread before his feet, not garments or soulless olive branches, which delight the eye for a few hours and then wither, but ourselves, clothed in his grace, or rather, clothed completely in him. We who have been baptized into Christ must ourselves be the garments that we spread before him. Now that the crimson stains of our sins have been washed away in the saving waters of baptism and we have become white as pure wool, let us present the conqueror of death, not with mere branches of palms but with the real rewards of his victory. Let our souls take the place of the welcoming branches as we join today in the children’s holy song: Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord. Blessed is the king of Israel."
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Re: Sermons

Postby Theophilus » April 18th, 2011, 11:51 pm

Great and Holy Monday: The meaning of Beauty
by Maximos Lavriotes

The Church inaugurates the beginning of Passion Week with the biblical image of the noble Joseph. It is a moving and deeply instructive story, he is hated to death by his eleven brothers who throw him into a ditch; he is sold to merchants for a pittance by his brothers who then tell their inconsolable father that all they had found were the bloody remains of his extraordinary garment.

Their father believes them and falls into grief, but Joseph becomes a king in Egypt, having escaped from the wiles of the woman who loved him madly. In the end, he forgives his brothers and even feeds them in a time of famine.

Even more compelling than this biblical narrative is the use that the Orthodox Church makes of it. It calls Joseph “utterly good” not “utterly virtuous” and in this way demonstrates the true understanding that early Christianity had of “Goodness.” Theirs was not an aesthetic approach but rather a sincere appreciation of an ultimate reality; every bearer of the good possesses primordial beauty. Not a beauty which is blinding but real Goodness which is overwhelming. This understanding of beauty as ultimate Goodness is deeply biblical; First of all the Creator, in Genesis, looked upon the whole of His creation, on “everything that he had made, and indeed, it was very good.” (Gen. 1:31)

The Fathers and Theologians of the East justifiably identify “Being” with both Goodness and Beauty. It suffices that something or someone exists as a creature, that its existence is owned directly to the Creator for it to be imbued with ultimate Beauty; this type of beauty has no relation at all to what cultured people and aesthetes call beauty. Worms, snakes, and lizards, wild animals and poisonous insects are “very good”) (hence “very beautiful” (Gen. 1:31) since they are divine creations; this is true especially of mankind, the crown of creation which is innately adorned with every virtue. Every one who sets all these virtues into full motion, proves himself to be Good indeed (Beautiful), and as noble as is Joseph. In effect, this means great hardship and much pain. He fled easy and cheap pleasure and for that reason was imprisoned and tortured.

In his image, the Church recognizes a prefiguring of the Passion of Christ, and thus, he stands out in the Service of Holy Monday. And this prominence is a powerful scourging of our insane preconceptions of “beauty.” It is not beauty to charm the masses with one’s smile or knowledge or artistry. Beauty is not that which provokes an irrational attraction on the souls of people. Joseph embraced the pain and death which his brothers offered him and transformed that pain into forgiveness, goodness, mercy and benefaction heralding thus the role of Christ. He remained noble exactly because he did not allow evil, hatred and human passions to dominate him. He demonstrated just how beautiful one remains when one willingly accepts to live with pain and anguish, what a most excellent accomplishment it is to accept pain and death, not from enemies, but from one’s own brothers.

In contemporary societies around the globe, where every type of fratricide is by now common and daily routine, even today the all beautiful face of Joseph gives nourishment of the type we are totally lacking: it offers the seeds of love into the hands of those who have hated involuntarily not only their brother and fellow man, but the very Creator of this unparalleled human Beauty. It is with this boundless goodness and with this unseen beauty that the Church chooses to celebrate the “beginnings of the Passion of the Lord.”
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Re: Sermons

Postby Theophilus » April 21st, 2011, 10:11 pm

On the Saving Passion of our Lord and Master Jesus Christ
by St. Theodore the Studite

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Given on Great and Holy Friday.

Brethren and Fathers, while the sufferings of our Lord Jesus Christ when they are recalled are always able to pierce the soul, they do so especially in these present days, on which each of them reached its end. What then are they? The murderous council against Him, the Jewish arrest, His being led away to death, His arraignment before Pilate's tribunal, the interrogation, the scourging, the blows, the spittings, the insults, the mockeries, the ascent of the Cross, the nailing of his hands and feet, the tasting of gall, the piercing of His side and all the other things which blazed forth with them, which the world cannot contain, nor can anyone worthily proclaim, not human tongue, nor even all the tongues of angels together.

For let us consider, brethren, this great and ineffable mystery. The Lord "who reveals the counsels of hearts" [1 Cor. 4:5] and knows every human desire, is the One who is taken before a council of death; the Lord "who bears all things by the word of his power" [Hebrews 1:3]is the One who is handed over to sinners; the Lord "who binds the water in the clouds" [Job 26:8] and sows in the earth in due season and uniformly is the One who is led away prisoner; the Lord "who measures the heavens with the span of His hand and the earth in a handful and weighed all the mountains in the balance" [Isaias 40:12] is the one who is struck by the hand of a servant; the Lord who adorned the boundaries of the earth with flowers is the One who is dishonourably crowned with thorns; the Lord who planted the tree of life in Paradise is the One who is hanged upon an accursed tree.

O great and more then natural sights! The sun saw them and faded, the moon saw them and was darkened, the earth perceived them was shaken, the rocks perceived them and were rent, all creation was turned back at the outrages done to the Master. The lifeless elements which have no senses, as if endowed with life and sensation from fear of the Lord and from the spectacle of what is seen, were amazed and altered; and do we, who have been honoured with reason, for whose sake Christ died, remain untouched and unweeping in these days? How could we be less rational than things which have no reason, more unfeeling than the stones? In no way, my brothers, in no way.

Let us rather be amazed in a manner worthy of God, by being changed with a fair change; let us draw down tears, sacrifice the passions, changing insults for insults and exchanging wounds for wounds, the one through obedience, the other through unflinching confession. Do we not see the burning incitements of divine love? Who ever dwelt in prison for a friend? Who accepted slaughter for their beloved? But our good God not only did the one and both of them, but accepted ten thousand sufferings for the sake of us, the condemned. Fittingly then the blessed Apostle, when he thought on these things and became powerfully aware of the love of God, said: "For I am persuaded that neither death nor life, neither angels nor rules nor powers, neither present nor future, neither height nor depth, nor any other creature will be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord" [Rom. 8:38-39].

For such was the love God had for us that "He gave His only Son, that all who believe in him might not perish," as it is written, "but have eternal life" [John 3:16]. As an exchange for this love, the saints, when they had nothing to offer, offered their own bodies and blood by asceticism and struggle, singing with blessed David the song: "What return may we make to the Lord for all that He has given to us?" [Psalm 115:3] Let us also, brethren, cry out these words each day, as we serve Him with an unceasing attitude of love, striving again and again for what is better, so that we may become heirs with the saints of the eternal blessings in Christ Jesus our Lord, to whom be glory and might with the Father and the Holy Spirit, now and for ever, and to the ages of ages.
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Re: Sermons

Postby Theophilus » May 2nd, 2011, 7:08 pm

Rejoicing In the Destruction of the Ungodly
by St. Cyril of Alexandria

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        As the time approached for him to be taken up to heaven, Jesus resolutely set out for Jerusalem. And he sent messengers on ahead, who went into a Samaritan village to get things ready for him; but the people there did not welcome him, because he was heading for Jerusalem. When the disciples James and John saw this, they asked, “Lord, do you want us to call fire down from heaven to destroy them?” But Jesus turned and rebuked them. Then he and his disciples went to another village.
        - Luke 9:51-56

What, then, was the purpose of this occurrence? He was going up to Jerusalem, as the time of His passion was already drawing near. He was about to endure the contumelies of the Jews; He was about to be set at nought by the scribes and Pharisees; and to suffer those things which they inflicted upon Him when they proceeded to the accomplishment of all violence and wicked audacity. In order, therefore, that they [the disciples] might not be offended when they saw Him suffering, as understanding that He would have them also to be patient, and not to murmur greatly, even though men treat them with contumely, He, so to speak, made the contempt they met with from the Samaritans a preparatory exercise in the matter. They had not received the messengers. It was the duty of the disciples, treading in the footsteps of their Lord, to bear it patiently as becometh saints, and not to say anything of them wrathfully. But they were not yet so disposed; but being seized with too hot indignation, they would have called down fire upon them from heaven, as far as their will went. But Christ rebuked them for so speaking.

See here, I pray, how great is the difference between us and God: for the distance is immeasurable. For He is slow to anger, and long-suffering, and of incomparable gentleness and love to mankind: but we children of earth are quick unto anger, hasty unto impatience, and refuse with indignation to be judged by others when we are found out in committing any wrong act; while we are most ready to find fault with others. And therefore God the Lord of all affirms, saying; "For My thoughts are not as your thoughts, nor your ways as My ways; but as the heaven is far from the earth, so are My ways from your ways, and My thoughts from your thoughts." Such, then, is He Who is Lord of all: but we, as I said, being readily vexed, and easily led into anger, take sometimes severe and intolerable vengeance upon those who have occasioned us some trifling annoyance: and though commanded to live according to the Gospel, we fall short of the practice commanded by the law. For the law indeed said, "Eye for eye; tooth for tooth; hand for hand:" and commanded that an equal retribution should suffice: but we, as I said, though perhaps we have suffered but a trifling wrong, would retaliate very harshly, not remembering Christ, who said: "The disciple is not greater than his teacher, nor the slave than his master;" Who also, "when He was reviled, reviled not again; when suffering, threatened not; but committed His cause to Him Who judgeth righteously." As treading this path much-enduring Job also is justly admired: for it is written of him, "What man is like Job, who drinketh wrongs like a draught?" For their benefit, therefore, He rebuked the disciples, gently restraining the sharpness of their wrath, and not permitting them to murmur violently against those who sinned, but persuading them rather to be longsuffering, and to cherish a mind immovable by ought of this.

It benefited them also in another way: they were to be the instructors of the whole world, and to travel through the cities and villages, proclaiming everywhere the good tidings of salvation. Of necessity, therefore, while seeking to fulfil their mission, they must fall in with wicked men, who would reject the divine tidings, and, so to speak, not receive Jesus to lodge with them. Had Christ, therefore, praised them for wishing that fire should come down upon the Samaritans, and that so painful a torment should be inflicted upon them, they would have been similarly disposed in many other instances, and when men disregarded the sacred message, would have pronounced their condemnation, and called down fire upon them from above. And what would have been the result of such conduct? The sufferers would have been innumerable, and no longer would the disciples have been so much physicians of the sick, as torturers rather, and intolerable to men everywhere. For their own good, therefore, they were rebuked, when thus enraged beyond measure at the contumely of the Samaritans: in order that they might learn that as ministers of the divine tidings, they must rather be full of longsuffering and gentleness; not revengeful; not given to wrath, nor savagely attacking those who offend them.

And that the ministers of God's message were longsuffering, Paul teaches us, saying, "For I think that God hath set forth us the apostles last, as it were, condemned to death; for we are made a spectacle unto the world, and to angels, and to men. Being reviled, we bless; being defamed, we persuade: we have become the offscouring of the world; the refuse of all men up to this day." He wrote also to others, or rather to all who had not yet received Christ in them, but, so to speak, were still afflicted with the pride of the Samaritans: "We pray you in Christ's stead, be ye reconciled to God."

Great, therefore, is the benefit of the gospel lessons to those who are truly perfect in mind; and may we also, taking them unto ourselves, benefit our souls, ever praising Christ the Saviour of all: by Whom and with Whom to God the Father be praise and dominion, with the Holy Spirit, for ever and ever, Amen.
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