Game for International Book Week

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Reviews, recommendations, books to avoid. What have you been reading?

Game for International Book Week

Postby Sprocket » September 23rd, 2012, 5:59 am

Over on Facebook, some guitar-twanging nutcase called Ben Donald promoted a daft idea that's gone viral. It appears that it is (or was; It was presumably last week) International Book Week, and the idea is to grab whatever book is nearest to you, turn to page 52, and post the fifth sentence. Do NOT give the title of the book. I don't know whether you're supposed to count an incomplete sentence at the top of the page which started on page 51, or only the complete sentences, but for the sake of consistency, let's agree that you only count the complete ones.
My opening entry is a bit more plebeian than my entry on FB, but the nearest book was different this time:

"Their meaty flesh makes them ideal for slicing and eating in sandwiches."
Treason doth never prosper: what's the reason?
Why, if it prosper, none dare call it treason.
Sir John Harington (1561-1620)
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Re: Game for International Book Week

Postby GregB » September 23rd, 2012, 7:25 am

"Their meaty flesh makes them ideal for slicing and eating in sandwiches."

I take it we're supposed to guess which book it is, or some clue to it (eg. the kind of book it is.) So, is the quote from '100 Tasty Recipes For Culinary Cannibals'? :mrgreen:

No? Well, the only popular UK chefs I know of are Nigella Lawson and Jamie Oliver. As it's unlikely that you'd buy anything by the daughter of Thatcher's chancellor and anti-GW campaigner (not to mention someone bearing the bloody silly name 'Nigella' anyway), I'll opt for some cookery book by Jamie Oliver.

My p.52 first sentence is:

"At first, there were only 538 paintings on display and the museum comprised only the Grande Galerie and the Salon Carré."
"The wiles of dissembling fate afford us the illusion of freedom, yet in the end always lead us into the same trap."
- Jean Cocteau
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Re: Game for International Book Week

Postby Sprocket » September 23rd, 2012, 7:33 am

You can try to guess the book if you want to. Mine was 'The Tomato Book: a guide to the pleasures of choosing, growing and cooking', by Gail Harland and Sofia Larrinua-Craxton. Is yours about the Louvre?
Incidentally, it's supposed to be the fifth sentence, not the first.
Treason doth never prosper: what's the reason?
Why, if it prosper, none dare call it treason.
Sir John Harington (1561-1620)
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Sprocket
 
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Re: Game for International Book Week

Postby GregB » September 23rd, 2012, 7:45 am

Oops, sorry! :oops: (Must be a touch of Sunday morning dyslexia.) OK, here's the fifth sentence, then:

"Until 1848 the annual exhibition of new paintings took place in the Salon Carré of the Louvre, hence its name ('the Salon'.)"

No, though it would seem to be so, it isn't a history of the Louvre itself. So as not to drag things out, I'll just say it's a complete history of the gallery's most famous exhibit...
"The wiles of dissembling fate afford us the illusion of freedom, yet in the end always lead us into the same trap."
- Jean Cocteau
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Re: Game for International Book Week

Postby Sprocket » September 23rd, 2012, 8:22 am

The Mona Lisa, presumably.
Treason doth never prosper: what's the reason?
Why, if it prosper, none dare call it treason.
Sir John Harington (1561-1620)
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Sprocket
 
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Re: Game for International Book Week

Postby GregB » September 23rd, 2012, 8:35 am

Yes, that's it. The book is 'Mona Lisa: The History of the World's Most famous Painting' by Donald Sassoon. Not as dry as it sounds, it begins with all the known details surrounding Da Vinci's painting of the work and then traces its history to the present day, with all the other works influenced by it (including the hundreds of caricatures and parodies of it.)

Anyway, on with the page 52, fifth sentences:
"The wiles of dissembling fate afford us the illusion of freedom, yet in the end always lead us into the same trap."
- Jean Cocteau
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Re: Game for International Book Week

Postby Lyn » September 23rd, 2012, 11:08 am

"This will not be achieved without considerable practice, so we must for some weeks be content with the legs being parallel with our body."
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Re: Game for International Book Week

Postby Sprocket » September 23rd, 2012, 11:19 am

Oo-er missus! 'The unexpurgated Karma Sutra', perhaps?
Treason doth never prosper: what's the reason?
Why, if it prosper, none dare call it treason.
Sir John Harington (1561-1620)
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Sprocket
 
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Location: Hemel Hempstead, Herts.

Re: Game for International Book Week

Postby Lyn » September 23rd, 2012, 11:38 am

No, sorry Sprocks. I grabbed the nearest book and can assure you that was not it. (You don't do Facebook do you?)
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Re: Game for International Book Week

Postby Sprocket » September 23rd, 2012, 11:42 am

Yes - that's where I got this idea from!
Treason doth never prosper: what's the reason?
Why, if it prosper, none dare call it treason.
Sir John Harington (1561-1620)
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Sprocket
 
Posts: 16177
Joined: October 25th, 2007, 11:21 am
Location: Hemel Hempstead, Herts.

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